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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 44 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 10 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Lydia (Turkey) or search for Lydia (Turkey) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
s Thracians, the Illyrian with his Illyrians, and so also all other nations, we are told. Those in Europe, at any rate, are said to be free and independent of one another even to this day. But Cyrus, finding the nations in Asia also independent in exactly the same way, started out with a little band of Persians and became the leader of the Medes by their full consent and of the HyrcaniansThe extent of his kingdom by theirs; he then conquered Syria, Assyria, Arabia, Cappadocia, both Phrygias, Lydia, Caria, Phoenicia, and Babylonia; he ruled also over Bactria, India, and Cilicia; and he was likewise king of the Sacians, Paphlagonians, Magadidae, and very many other nations, of which one could not even tell the names; he brought under his sway the Asiatic Greeks also; and, descending to the sea, he added both Cyprus and Egypt to his empire. He ruled over these nations, even though theyThe secret of his power did not speak the same language as he, nor one nation the same as another; for a
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 5 (search)
of Assyria had subjugatedAssyria's plans for world conquest all Syria, a very large nation, and had made the king of Arabia his vassal; he already had Hyrcania under his dominion and was closely besetting Bactria. So he thought that if he should break the power of the Medes, he should easily obtain dominion over all the nations round about; for he considered the Medes the strongest of the neighbouring tribes. Accordingly, he sent around to all those under his sway and to Croesus, the king of Lydia, to the king of Cappadocia; to both Phrygias, to Paphlagonia, India, Caria, and Cilicia; and to a certain extent also he misrepresented the Medes and Persians, for he said that they were great, powerful nations, that they had intermarried with each other, and were united in common interests, and that unless some one attacked them first and broke their power, they would be likely to make war upon each one of the nations singly and subjugate them. Some, then, entered into an alliance with him
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 2, chapter 1 (search)
e story one way and another another, they all say the same thing.”“We shall have to fight those men, then?”“Aye,” said he; “we must of necessity.”“Well then,” said Cyrus, “won't you please tell me, if you know, how great the forces are that are coming against us; and tell me of our own as well, so that with full information about both we may lay our plans accordingly, how best to enter the conflict.”“Listen then,” said Cyaxares. “Croesus, theThe probable number of the opposing forces king of Lydia, is said to be coming at the head of 10,000 horsemen and more than 40,000 peltasts and bowmen. And they say that Artacamas, the king of Greater Phrygia, is coming at the head of 8000 horse and not fewer than 40,000 lancers and peltasts; and Aribaeus, the king of Cappadocia, has 6000 horse and not fewer than 30,000 bowmen and peltasts; while the Arabian, Aragdus, has about 10,000 horsemen, about 100 chariots of war, and a great host of slingers. As for the Greeks who dwel
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 4, chapter 2 (search)
le some were leaping upon their horses, some bridling them, others helping the women into the wagons, and others were snatching up their most valuable possessions to save them; still others were caught in the act of burying theirs, while the most of them sought refuge in precipitate flight. We may imagine that they were doing many other things also—all sorts of other things—except that no one offered to resist, but they perished without striking a blow. As it was summer, Croesus, the king of Lydia, had had his women sent on by night in carriages, that they might proceed more comfortably in the cool of the night, and he himself was following after with his cavalry. And the Phrygian king, the ruler of Phrygia on the Hellespont, they say, did the same. And when they saw the fugitives who were overtaking them, they enquired of them what was happening, and then they also took to flight as fast as they could go. But the king of Cappadocia and the Arabian king, as they were still near by and
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
ed to keep their respective positions in mind. Thus, then, Cyrus was occupied.From Babylon a report was now brought byThe king leaves Babylon deserters and confirmed by his prisoners of war, that the Assyrian king had gone off in the direction of Lydia with many talents of gold and silver and with other treasures and jewels of every sort. So it became general talk among the rank and file of the soldiers that he was already conveying his treasures to a place of safety because he was afraid. But s in use in the king's dominions.He also had a large number of camels, some collected from among his friends and some taken in war, all brought together. Thus these plans were being put into execution.Now, he wished to send some one as a spy into Lydia to find out what the Assyrian was doing, and it seemed to him that Araspas, the guardian of the beautiful woman, was the proper person to go on this mission. Now Araspas's case had taken a turn likeAraspas and Panthea this: he had fallen in love
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
ecause we were frightened, but because we wished that this, too, were already accomplished. “But our disappointment is past, seeing that we are to contend not for Syria only, where there is an abundance of grain and flocks and date-palms, but for Lydia as well; for in that land there is an abundance of wine and figs and olive oil, and its shores are washed by the sea; and over its waters more good things are brought than any one has ever seen—when we think of that,” said he, “we are no longer vexed, but our courage rises to the highest point, with desire to come all the more quickly into the enjoyment of these good things in Lydia also.”Thus he spoke; and the allies were all pleased with his speech and applauded. “And indeed, my friends,” said Cyrus, “I proposeCyrus proposes an immediate advance that we move against them as soon as possible, in the first place that we may reach the place where their supplies are being collected, before they do, if we can; and in the second p
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 2 (search)
the command, deeming myself fit to be the greatest; but, as it seems, I did not know myself. For I thought I was capable of carrying on war against you; but I was no match for you; for you are in the first place a scion of the gods and in the second place the descendant of an unbroken line of kings, and finally you have been practising virtue from your childhood on, while the first of my ancestors to wear a crown, I am told, was at the same time king and freedman.Gyges, the shepherd king of Lydia. Therefore, as I was thus without knowledge, I have my just deserts. “But, Cyrus,” said he, “I know myself now. But do you think Apollo's declaration still holds true, that if I know myself I shall be happy? I ask you this for the reason that under the present circumstances it seems to me you can judge best; for you are also in a position to fulfil it.” “You must give me time to consider this,Cyrus restores to Croesus his household Croesus,” Cyrus replied; “for when I think of your ha
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 6 (search)
erywhere. And that will be no more than fair; for if any danger threatens anywhere, it is we who shall have to ward it off.” With these words he concluded his address onCyrus appoints the satraps that occasion; and then he chose out from the number of his friends those whom he saw eager to go on the conditions named and who seemed to him best qualified, and sent them as satraps to the following countries: Megabyzus to Arabia, Artabatas to Cappadocia, Artacamas to Phrygia Major, Chrysantas to Lydia and Ionia, Adusius to Caria (it was he for whom the Carians had petitioned), and Pharnuchus to Aeolia and Phrygia on the Hellespont. He sent out no Persians as satraps over Cilicia or Cyprus or Paphlagonia, because these he thought joined his expedition against Babylon voluntarily; he did, however, require even these nations to pay tribute. As Cyrus then organized the service, so is it even to this day: the garrisons upon the citadels are immediately under the king's control, and the colonel