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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 98 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 78 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 60 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 46 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 40 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 36 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 32 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Preussen or search for Preussen in all documents.

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is this that is destroying the vitalities of the army and the energies of the struggle.--He dwelt at much length upon this point, and said if the detailed men able to do military duty were put in the ranks, the deserters brought back, and the Exemption law-modified in many particulars, we would have an army able to cope with our adversaries.--Unless this was done — unless there was a change in the policy of the Government, we should have a protracted and bloody struggle — a struggle such as Prussia shed, when one-sixth of her whole male population perished upon the field of battle, when the authority of her magistrates and laws was suspended, and the horrors of pestilence and famine were added to the atrocities of war. But if the measure he indicated were adopted, he was satisfied the army would be so increased that another year would terminate the struggle; the clouds would pass away, and the bow of peace once more span the arch of the heavens." Mr. Dorgan, of Ala., also spoke i
n which only 11,000 Athenians were engaged. The invasion of Xerxes was nothing compared to it, for his whole force of five millions was discomfited, ruined, almost exterminated by two battles--one at sea and the other on land. The invasions of Prussia, during the time of the great Frederick, were nothing to it; for, although the invading nations together counted one hundred millions of souls, they never had more than two hundred thousand men engaged at any one time in the invasion. The invasion of France by the allies was nothing to it, for they did not carry half a million of men to Paris when that capital was treacherously delivered up to them. But these States of the Confederacy, numbering only as many white inhabitants as Prussia numbered under Frederick, have resisted, and resisted successfully, for nearly three years, the utmost efforts of armies that at one time counted eleven hundred thousand men in their ranks, and have never, for two years at least, counted at any o