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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 554 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 226 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 154 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 150 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 138 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 92 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 54 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 50 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 46 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.). You can also browse the collection for Egypt (Egypt) or search for Egypt (Egypt) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Agesilaus (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 2 (search)
d Mausolus (another of those who contributed money to Sparta, owing to his old ties of hospitality with Agesilaus), sent him home with a magnificent escort. Subsequently, when he was now about eighty years of age, he became aware that the king of Egypt was bent on war with Persia, and was possessed of large forces of infantry and cavalry and plenty of money. He was delighted when a summons for help reached him from the Egyptian king, who actually promised him the chief command. For he believed lt that he had been grossly deceived, and was in doubt what he ought to do. At this juncture first a portion of the Egyptian troops, operating as a separate army, revolted from the king, and then the rest of his forces deserted him. The king left Egypt and fled in terror to Sidon in Phoenicia, while the Egyptians split up into two parties, and each chose its own king. Agesilaus now realised that if he helped neither king, neither of them would pay the Greeks their wages, neither would provide a
Xenophon, Agesilaus (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 11 (search)
noble glory so long as his body could support the vigour of his soul. What man's youth, then, did not seem weaker than his old age? For who in his prime was so formidable to his foes as Agesilaus at the very limit of human life? Whose removal brought such welcome relief to the enemy as the death of Agesilaus, despite his years? Who gave such confidence to allies as Agesilaus, though now on the threshold of death? What young man was more regretted by his friends than Agesilaus, though he died full of years? So complete was the record of his service to his fatherland that it did not end even when he died: he was still a bountiful benefactor of the state when he was brought home to be laid in his eternal resting-place, and, having raised up monuments of his virtue throughout the world, was buried with royal ceremony in his own land.The reference is to the money which Agesilaus had obtained in Egypt, and which was brought to the city with his body. For the burial see Xen. Const. Lac. end.