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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 554 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 226 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 154 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 150 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 138 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 92 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 54 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 50 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 46 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Egypt (Egypt) or search for Egypt (Egypt) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 172 (search)
You reject the Sicilian corn; why? because you are sending some yourself. Have you any Sicily of your own, which can supply you corn of another sort? When the senate decrees that corn he bought in Sicily, or when the people order this, this, as I imagine, is what they mean, that Sicilian corn is to be brought from Sicily. When you reject all the corn of Sicily, do you send corn to Rome from Egypt or from Syria? You reject the corn of Halesa, of Cephalaedis, of Thermae, of Amestras, of Tyndaris, of Herbita, and of many other cities. What has happened then to cause the lands of these people to bear corn of such a sort while you were praetor, as they never bore before, so that it can neither be approved of by you, nor by the Roman people; especially when the managers of the different companies had taken corn
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 61 (search)
For you know that the kings of Syria, the boyish sons of King Antiochus, have lately been at Rome. And they came not on account of the kingdom of Syria; for that they had obtained possession of without dispute, as they had received it from their father and their ancestors; but they thought that the kingdom of Egypt belonged to them and to Selene their mother. When they, being hindered by the critical state of the republic at that time, were not able to obtain the discussion of the subject as they wished before the senate, they departed for Syria, their paternal kingdom. One of them—the one whose name is Antiochus—wished to make his journey through Sicily. And so, while Verres was praetor, he came to Syracu