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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 554 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 226 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 154 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 150 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 138 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 92 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 54 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 50 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 46 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Egypt (Egypt) or search for Egypt (Egypt) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 11 (search)
Having thus conciliated popular favour, he endeavoured, through his interest with some of the tribunes, to get Egypt assigned to him as a province, by an act of the people. The pretext alleged for the creation of this extraordinary government, was, that the Alexandrians had violently expelled their king,Ptolemy Auletes, the son of Cleopatra. whom the senate had complimented with the title of an ally and friend of the Roman people. This was generally resented; but, notwithstanding, there was so much opposition from the faction of the nobles, that he could not carry his point. In order, therefore, to diminish their influence by every means in his power, he restored the trophies erected in honor of Caius Marius, on account of his victories over Jugurtha, the Cimbri, and the Teutoni, which had been demolished by Sylla; and when sitting in judgment upon murderers, he treated those as assassins, who, in the late proscription, had received money from the treasury, for bringing in the heads
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Otho (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 12 (search)
y could have known it for such. He used to shave every day, and rub his face with soaked bread; the use of which he began when the down first appeared upon his chin, to prevent his having any beard. It is said likewise that he celebrated publicly the sacred rites of Isis, Jupiter, to prevent the discovery of his amour with Io, the daughter of the river Inachus, transformed her into a heifer, in which metamorphosis she was placed by Juno under the watchful inspection of Argus; but flying into Egypt, and her keeper being killed by Mercury, she recovered her human shape, and was married to Osiris. Her husband afterwards became a god of the Egyptians, and she a goddess, under the name of Isis. She was represented with a mural crown on her head, a cornucopia in one hand, and a sistrum (a musical instrument) in the other. clad in a linen garment, such as is used by the worshippers of that goddess. These circumstances, I imagine, caused the world to wonder the more that his death was so lit
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 13 (search)
Having renounced all hope of obtaining Egypt for his province, he stood candidate for the office of chief pontiff, to secure which, he had recourse to the most profuse bribery. Calculating, on this occasion, the enormous amount of the debts he had contracted, he is reported to have said to his mother, when she kissed him at his going out in the morning to the assembly of the people, "I will never return home unless I am elected pontiff." In effect, he left so far behind him two most powerful competitors, who were much his superiors both in age and rank, that he had more votes in their own tribes, than they both had in all the tribes together.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 17 (search)
ice and discharged, he returned to Italy. In his passage thither, he encountered two violent storms, the first between the promontories of Peloponnesus and AEtolia, and the other about the Ceraunian mountains; in both of which a part of his Liburnian squadron was sunk, the spars and rigging of his own ship carried away, and the rudder broken in pieces. He remained only twenty-seven days at Brundisium, until the demands of the soldiers were settled, and then went, by way of Asia and Syria, to Egypt, where laying siege to Alexandria, whither Antony had fled with Cleopatra, he made himself master of it in a short time. He drove Antony to kill himself, after he had used every effort to obtain conditions of peace, and he saw his corpse.There is no other authority for Augustus having viewed Antony's corpse. Plutarch informs us, that on hearing his death, Augustus retired into the interior of his tent, and wept over the fate of his colleague and friend, his associate in so many former strugg
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 18 (search)
cophagus, which was afterwards exchanged for one of glass, in which probably Augustus saw the remains. and after viewing them for some time, he paid honours to the memory of that prince, by offering a golden crown, and scattering flowers upon the body.A custom of all ages and of people the most remote from each other. Being asked if he wished to see the tombs of the Ptolemies also; he replied, "I wish to see a king, not dead men."Meaning the degenerate race of the Ptolemean kings. He reduced Egypt into the form of a province; and to render it more fertile, and more capable of supplying Rome with corn, he employed his army to scour the canals, into which the Nile, upon its rise, discharges itself; but which during a long series of years had become nearly choked up with mud. To perpetuate the glory of his victory at Actium, he built the city of Nicopolis on that part of the coast, and established games to be celebrated there every five years; enlarging likewise an old temple of Apollo,
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 20 (search)
ar from its former position. This obelisk is a solid piece of red granite, without hieroglyphics, and, with the pedestal and ornaments at the top, is 182 feet high. The height of the obelisk itself is 113 palms, or 84 feet. had been brought from Egypt;Pliny relates some curious particulars of this ship:-"A fir tree of prodigious size was used in the vessel which, by the command of Caligula, brought the obelisk from Egypt, which stands in the Vatican Circus, and four blocks of the same sort of Egypt, which stands in the Vatican Circus, and four blocks of the same sort of stone to support it. Nothing certainly ever appeared on the sea more astonishing than this vessel; 120,000 bushels of lentiles served for its ballast; the length of it nearly equalled all the left side of the port of Ostia; for it was sent there by the emperor Claudius. The thickness of the tree was as much as four men could embrace with their arms."-B. xvi. c. 76. and built upon piles a very lofty tower, in imitation of the Pharos at Alexandria, on which lights were burnt to direct mariners
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 35 (search)
tle of Pharsalia. Pursuing him in his flight to Alexandria, where he was tinformed of his murder, he presently found himself also engaged, under all the disadvantages of time and place, in a very dangerous war, with king Ptolemy, who, he saw, had treacherous designs upon his life. It was winter, and he, within the walls of a well-provided and subtle enemy, was destitute of every thing, and wholly unprepared for such a conflict. He succeeded, however, in his enterprise, and put the kingdom of Egypt into the hands of Cleopatra and her younger brother; being afraid to make it a province, lest, under an aspiring prefect, it might become the centre of revolt. From Alexandria he went into Syria, and thence to Pontus, induced by intelligence which he had received respecting Pharnaces. This prince, who was son of the great Mithridates, had seized the opportunity which the distraction of the times offered for making war upon his neighbours, and his insolence and fierceness had grown with his s
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Nero (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 35 (search)
oppaea. In the same way, he destroyed all yho were allied to him either by blood or marriage; amongst whom was young Aulus Plautinus. * * * Thomson omits material here * * * His step-son, Rufinus Crispinus, Poppaea's son, though a minor, he ordered to be drowned in the sea, while he was fishing, by his own slaves, because he was reported to act Trequenty amongst his play-fellows the part of a general or an emperor. He banished Tuscus, his nurse's son, for presuming, when he was procurator of Egypt, to wash in the baths which had been constructed in expectation of his own coming. Seneca, his preceptor, he forced to kill himself Seneca was accused of complicity in the conspiracy of Caius Piso. Tacitus furnishes some interesting details of the circumstances under which the philosopher calmly submitted to his fate, which was announced to him when at supper with his friends, at his villa, near Rome.--Tacitus, b. xiv. xv. though upon his desiring leave to retire, and offering to surrender
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 41 (search)
He displayed his munificence to all ranks of the people on various occasions. Moreover, upon his bringing the treasure belonging to the kings of Egypt into the city, in his Alexandrian triumph, he made money so plentiful, that interest fell, and the price of land rose considerably. And afterwards, as often as large sums of money came into his possession by means of confiscations, he would lend it free of interest, for a fixed term, to such as could give security for the double of what was borrowed. The estate necessary to qualify a senator, instead of eight hundred thousand sesterces, the former standard, he ordered, for the future, to be twelve hundred thousand; and to those who had not so much, he made good the deficiency. He often made donations to the people, but generally of different sums; sometimes four hundred, sometimes three hundred, or two hundred and fifty sesterces: upon which occasions, he extended his bounty even to young boys, who before were not used to receive anyth
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Nero (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 47 (search)
comply, others absolutely refusing; and one of them crying out aloud, Usque adeone mori miserum est? Say, is it then so sad a thing to die? Aen. xii. 646. he was in great perplexity whether he should submit himself to Galba, or apply to the Parthians for protection, or else appear before the people dressed in mourning, and, upon the rostra, in the most piteous manner, beg pardon for his past misdemeanors, and, if he could not prevail, request of them to grant him at least the government of Egypt. A speech to this purpose was afterwards found in his writing-case. But it is conjectured that he durst not venture upon this project, for fear of being torn to pieces, before he could get to the forum. Deferring, therefore, his resolution until the next day, he awoke about midnight, and finding the guards withdrawn, he leaped out of bed, and sent round for his friends. But none of them vouchsafing any message in reply, he went with a few attendants to their houses. The doors being every whe
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