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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 314 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 194 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 148 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 120 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 96 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 60 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 34 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 32 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Dinarchus, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Peloponnesus (Greece) or search for Peloponnesus (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 10 (search)
n convicted and the names of those who shared the money published; the betrayal of Thebes, for which Demosthenes was responsible,In 335 B.C., owing to a report that Alexander, who was fighting the Triballi, had been killed, Thebes revolted against Macedonian domination encouraged by Demosthenes and others who assisted them to procure arms. When they applied for assistance to the Peloponnese and Athens, the Peloponnesians sent an army as far as the Isthmus, while Athens voted help but awaited the turn of events. Meanwhile Thebes was taken by Alexander and destroyed. Dinarchus, who goes into greater detail later (Din. 1.18-22), maintains that for ten talents of the Persian money Demosthenes could have secured the
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 14 (search)
speech against Philocles (Din. 3.17). Timotheus, an Athenian general and a friend of Isocrates, who recounts his exploits (Isoc. 15.107-113), sailed round the Peloponnese and gained a victory at Corcyra in 375 B.C. In 365 he took Samos, which was occupied by a Persian garrison, after a ten months' siege (Dem. 15.9). Thence he moved to T unprecedented amount of a hundred talents, which he could not pay, he went into exile in Chalcis. Cf. Isoc. 15.131. Athenians, although he sailed round the Peloponnese and defeated the Lacedaemonians in a naval battle at Corcyra, and was the son of CononConon, a general in the Peloponnesian war who fought at Aegospotami, was later joint
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 72 (search)
erals during their city's period of greatness (371-362 B.C.). In 371 they defeated Sparta at Leuctra and, in response to an appeal from the Arcadians who then rose against Sparta, entered the Peloponnese in 370. Here they refounded the town of Messene which the Spartans had destroyed at the end of the 8th century B.C. (Dio. Sic. 15.56 and Dio. Sic. 15.62-66). Epaminond Sic. 15.62-66). Epaminondas conducted three further invasions of the Peloponnese, penetrating Laconia, but never actually taking Sparta. It was probably during the second of these that he founded Megalopolis, the new capital of Arcadia; in the third he was killed at Mantinea (362 B.C.). so
Dinarchus, Against Aristogiton, section 24 (search)
, a noble decree of your ancestors on this question, providing for a pillar on the Acropolis at the time when Arthmius, son of Pithonax, the Zelite, is said to have brought the gold from the Persians to corrupt the Greeks.Demosthenes (Dem. 9.42 and Dem. 19.271) refers to this pillar. Arthmius of Zelea was an Athenian proxenus. He was sent by Artaxerxes to the Peloponnesus, probably in 461, to stir up war against the Athenians, who had been assisting a revolt in Egypt. (Cf. Thuc. 1.109; Dio. Sic. 11.74. 5; Aeschin. 3.258.) For before anyone had accepted it or given proof of his character they sentenced the man who had brought the gold to exile and banished him completely from the country. This decision, as I said, they engrave
Dinarchus, Against Aristogiton, section 25 (search)
on the pillar that Arthmius, son of Pithonax, the Zelite, was an enemy of the people and its allies, he and his descendants, and was exiled from Athens because he had brought the Persian gold to the Peloponnese. And yet if the people regarded the gold in the Peloponnese as a source of great danger to Greece, how can we remain unmoved at the sight of bribery in the city itself? Please attend to the inscription ots allies, he and his descendants, and was exiled from Athens because he had brought the Persian gold to the Peloponnese. And yet if the people regarded the gold in the Peloponnese as a source of great danger to Greece, how can we remain unmoved at the sight of bribery in the city itself? Please attend to the inscription on the pillar. Inscription
Dinarchus, Against Philocles, section 17 (search)
Then why will you wait, Athenians? What further crimes do you wish to hear of greater than those we have mentioned? Was it not you and your ancestors who made no allowance for Timotheus,This passage corresponds almost word for word with Din. 1.14. See note on that. though he had sailed round the Peloponnese and beaten the Spartans in the sea-fight at Corcyra, though his father was Conon who liberated Greece and he himself had taken Samos, Methone, Pydna, Potidaea, and twenty cities besides? You did not take this record into consideration at all, or allow such services to outweigh the case before you or the oaths which you swear before giving your verdict, but fined him a hundred talents, because Aristophon said he had been bribed by the Chians and Rhodians.