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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 314 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 194 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 148 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 120 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 96 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 60 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 34 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 32 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Peloponnesus (Greece) or search for Peloponnesus (Greece) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 17 (search)
prolonged to so late an hour, that, after the victory, he was obliged to sleep on board his ship. From Actium he went to the isle of Samos to winter; but being alarmed with the accounts of a mutiny amongst the soldiers he had selected from the main body of his army sent to Brundisium after the victory, who insisted on their being rewarded for their service and discharged, he returned to Italy. In his passage thither, he encountered two violent storms, the first between the promontories of Peloponnesus and AEtolia, and the other about the Ceraunian mountains; in both of which a part of his Liburnian squadron was sunk, the spars and rigging of his own ship carried away, and the rudder broken in pieces. He remained only twenty-seven days at Brundisium, until the demands of the soldiers were settled, and then went, by way of Asia and Syria, to Egypt, where laying siege to Alexandria, whither Antony had fled with Cleopatra, he made himself master of it in a short time. He drove Antony to ki
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Nero (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 19 (search)
azard of the voyage. For while he was making the circuit of the temples, having seated himself in that of Vesta, when he attempted to rise, the skirt of his robe stuck fast; and he was instantly seized with such a dimness in his eyes, that he could not see a yard before him. In Achaia, he attempted to make a cut through the Isthmus;It was a favourite project of the Caesars to make a navigable canal through the Isthmus of Corinth, to avoid the circumnavigation of the southern extremity of the Morea, now Cape Matapan, which, even in our days, has its perils. See JULIUS Caesar, C. xliv. and CALIGULA, C. xxi. and, having made a speech encouraging his pretorians to set about the work, on a signal given by sound of trumpet, he first broke ground with a spade, and carried off a basket full of earth upon his shoulders. He made preparations for an expedition to the Pass of the Caspian mountains;Caspiae Porta; so called from the difficulties opposed by the narrow and rocky defile to the passag