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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 296 8 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 64 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) or search for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
y mentioned to the Department. In the former, you are reported as leading the right column in the gun-boat Cayuga, as having preceded me up to the quarantine station, and as having captured the Chalmette regiment, and every possible credit is given you for the manner in which you conducted your line, and preceding us to attack the Chalmette forts. As to historians, I can, of course, do nothing. I have read but one account to which you allude (Dr. Boynton's), and that in reference to Mobile Bay, in which several mistakes occur, going to prove that historians are not always correct. I do not see how it is possible for me to give you greater credit for your services than is embodied in that report where your name is always prominent; but if you think that full credit has not been done you, which I confess, I regret to learn, you have, of course, a perfect right to make your appeal to the Department; for my own part, I always maintain the conviction that whatever errors may be ma
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
ntil the Sassacus drifted out of range. While the Sassacus was in contact with the Albemarle, it was impossible for the other vessels of the squadron to fire, for fear of injuring their consort; but they subsequently failed to take advantage of the act of the gallant Sassacus, and deliver blows upon the ram while she was at rest and somewhat demoralized from the shock she had received. It was by such concerted action that the Tennessee was forced to surrender to Farragut's vessels in Mobile Bay. The failure of the larger vessels to ram the Albemarle is accounted for by the indiscriminate firing from the smaller ones upon the enemy. These latter vessels answered the signals made by the senior officer, without obeying them. The engagement continued until 7:30 P. M., when darkness supervened. The Commodore Hull and the Ceres were left to keep sight of the ram, and to remain off the mouth of the Roanoke River if she succeeded in entering it, the other vessels coming to anchor i
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
rpool. While the forts at the entrance of Mobile Bay remained intact, the Confederates could contre his vessels for an attack on the forts in Mobile Bay, and promised that a land force should be fong this attack was to get the gun-boats into Mobile Bay through Grant's Pass, and to endeavor to dese and frigates) that could pass the bar into Mobile Bay, or that might attempt to enfilade Fort MorgU. S. Squadron, Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. The Tennessee had done Lackawanna in passing the forts and entering Mobile Bay on the 5th instant, I inadvertently omitted utes past 10 in the lower fleet anchorage of Mobile Bay. Enclosed please receive engineer's reporral order, no. 12. U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864. The Admiral returns thanor. The Navy commanded it and the waters of Mobile Bay, and the army having landed in its rear, shut you had on the morning of that day entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, an[13 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
els was bad, however, and the Confederate finally escaped with but one man killed and seven wounded--a small loss compared to their great gain. During the whole war there was not a more exciting adventure than this escape of the Florida into Mobile Bay. The gallant manner in which it was conducted excited great admiration, even among the men who were responsible for permitting it. We do not suppose there was ever a case where a man, under all the attending circumstances, displayed more energe notable ones of the war. He lighted the seas wherever he passed along, and committed such havoc among American merchantmen, that, if possible, he was even more dreaded than Semmes. We have only to say, that his being permitted to escape into Mobile Bay, and then to get out again, was the greatest example of blundering committed throughout the war. Every officer who knew Maffitt was certain that he would attempt to get out of Mobile, and we are forced to say that those who permitted his escape
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
ations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. Gallant services of Commodore Palmer blo can be found the reason why Captain Semmes did not approve of them. Joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. After the capture of Wilmington, Commodore Jameof Fish River, at a point called Danley's Mills, about seventeen miles above its junction with Mobile Bay. The gun-boats kept shelling the woods from Point Clear to Blakely River bar, while the troopr moved with the gun-boats, convoying 8,000 men of General Granger's force to the west side of Mobile Bay, for the purpose of attacking Mobile. On their anchoring at the objective point, it was found. Naval hospital. Surgeon, J. Jones; Assistant Surgeons, Thomas Hiland and Heber Smith. Mobile Bay. Acting-Master, F. H. Grove; Acting-Master's Mates, C. R. Marple and E. A. Morse; Acting-Th