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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 122 58 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 27 27 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Olustee (Florida, United States) or search for Olustee (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1861. The First regulars served for some time in Virginia in Toombs', then in Gen. George T. Ander-son's brigade, and after Fredericksburg, were on duty most of the time in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. They fought in the brigade of George P. Harrison at Olustee, later at Charleston; under Col. Richard A. Wayne were in Maj.-Gen. L. McLaws' division of Hardee's command at Savannah, November 20, 1864, and participated in the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865 in Harrison's brigade, in the division commanded, first by McLaws, and at the time of Johnston's surrender, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Walthall. The first colonel of the regiment, C. J. Williams, died in the early part of 1862.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
T. Lofton (K). This regiment served in Virginia until after Chancellorsville, then in North Carolina; also in Florida at Olustee, again in Virginia in 1864, and in North Carolina with Joe Johnston in 1865. Colonel Colquitt was promoted to brigadier-t was in North Carolina. It went with the other regiments of Colquitt's brigade to Florida and shared in the victory at Olustee in February, 1864, and returned to Virginia in time for the defense of Petersburg. In 1865 it participated in the campd in the brigade commanded by Gen. Alfred Colquitt; was sent to Florida with Colquitt, and helped to gain the victory of Olustee. Returning to Virginia in the spring of 1864, it assisted in the defense of Petersburg and renewed its brilliant career then in North Carolina; went with the rest of Colquitt's brigade to Florida in February, 1864, helping to put an end at Olustee to Federal invasion of that State; returned to Virginia in the spring of 1864 in time to assist in saving Petersburg fro
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
Second, composed of the Thirty-second and Sixty-fourth Georgia, First regulars, First Florida battalion, Bonaud's battalion and Guerard's battery, was commanded by Col. George P. Harrison, Thirty-second Georgia. The battle was brought on near Olustee by the advance of the Sixty-fourth Georgia, promptly supported in succession by Colquitt's brigade and Harrison's. General Colquitt commanded the line of battle, with Colonel Harrison in charge of the left. The battle began at 3 o'clock and cona reserves, and six South Carolina batteries. Although the year 1863 had closed in despondency, before the spring campaigns opened in Georgia and Virginia the hopes of the Southern people had been revived by a series of brilliant successes. Olustee, the first of these, has been described. Two days later Forrest gained a decisive victory in Mississippi, followed by one brilliant victory after another. Then came the defeat of Banks in Louisiana and of Steele in Arkansas, and the recovery o
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was sent into North Carolina under the orders of Gen. D. H. Hill. When the Federal forces began the invasion of Florida in 1864, Colquitt's brigade was hurried down to assist in the defense. On the field of Olustee, Colquitt was in actual command, and gained an overwhelming victory, which completely defeated the Federal scheme for the conquest of that State. When the campaign of 1864 opened in Virginia, Colquitt's brigade was hurried back to Richmond, reaattle of Bentonville, he participated honorably in the last important battle in the Carolinas. General Harrison was a brave and daring soldier, and in action shared the dangers of his men. He was twice wounded in battle on John's island, and at Olustee was again wounded and had his horse killed under him. At the close of the war he had just passed his twenty-fourth birthday. He removed to Alabama, where he has ever since made his home, at Opelika. Having studied law during the war, he was so