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ld them to prepare for a long and bloody war, and tried to impress them with the gravity of the occasion. After many short speeches, he became very much exhausted from the constant exertion. When the conductor noticed it he said, Never mind, when we stop at the next two or three stations I will blow off steam at My friends and fellow-citizens, and go off at once; and so he did, much to the disgust of the crowd. We proceeded without accident until we reached the Crutchfield House, at Chattanooga. There a crowd was gathered, among whom was the cordial proprietor, the elder Crutchfield. While the supper was being prepared, a speech was called for. Mr. Crutchfield's brother was a Union man, and had been drinking. He began a violent tirade against Mr. Davis. He had twelve or thirteen people with him who seemed to be his companions in jollity, but who did not partake of his irritation. He offered to resent personally anything Mr. Davis might say. The excitement became intense.
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 35: visit to Tennessee.—Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
Chapter 35: visit to Tennessee.—Battle of Murfreesboro. The President became anxious about affairs in the West, and was importuned to make a tour of observation there. As soon as he could leave the seat of government he went, accompanied by one of his aids, and subsequently wrote to me the following letter: From President to Mrs. Davis. Chattanooga, Tenn., December 15, 1862. We had a pleasant trip, and without an incident to relate, reached this place on the I ith, went to Murfreesboro on the 12th, and leave to-day for Mississippi. The troops at Murfreesboro were in fine spirits and well supplied. The enemy keep close in lines about Nashville, which place is too strongly fortified and garrisoned for attack by troops unprepared for regular approaches on fortifications. Much confidence was expressed in our ability to beat them if they advance. Last night, on my arrival here, a telegram announced the attack made at Fredericksburg. You can imagine my anxiety. No answe
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 42: President Davis's letter to General Johnston after the fall of Vicksburg. (search)
s they bear on this question. On November 24th last you were assigned, by Special Order No. 275, to a defined geographical command. The description included a portion of Western North Carolina and Northern Georgia, the States of Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi, and that portion of the State of Louisiana east of the Mississippi River. The order concluded in the following language: General Johnston will, for the purpose of correspondence and reports, establish his headquarters at Chattanooga, or such other place as in his judgment will best secure communication with the troops within the limits of his command, and will repair in person to any part of said command, whenever his presence may for the time be necessary, or desirable. This command by its terms embraced the armies under command of General Bragg in Tennessee, of General Pemberton at Vicksburg, as well as those at Port Hudson, Mobile, and the forces in East Tennessee. This general order has never been changed
ollecting arms, before the advance was begun, and then, moving slowly, found Rosecrans behind earthworks in and around Chattanooga. Bragg immediately posted his army along Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, and planned to drive Rosecrans out of Chattanooga, or to starve him into surrender. In this situation, General Grant was assigned to the command in Tennessee. On October 23d he arrived at Chattanooga. By his own report he found Rosecrans practically invested. Army supplieChattanooga. By his own report he found Rosecrans practically invested. Army supplies had to be hauled over almost impassable roads for sixty to seventy miles. The artillery horses and mules were starving. Grant's first movement was to supply the army by a shorter route, and to that end he captured Lookout Mountain. The Confr a bloody battle retreated during the night toward Tunnel Hill. General Grant pursued but a short distance beyond Chattanooga. This disaster depressed the hopes of the Confederates greatly; misfortunes had of late crowded so thick upon them