Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Augusta (Georgia, United States) or search for Augusta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
B. Millican, of 9th Georgia, both wounded. July 15th and 16th. Received furlough from Brigadier-General John H. Winder, a venerable officer, commanding Department of Henrico, and left on afternoon train for home. Supped at Petersburg. Paid $6.00 fare from Richmond to Weldon, N. C., 85 miles. July 17. Fare from Weldon to Raleigh $5.00, 98 miles. From Raleigh to Charlotte, 175 miles, fare $8.75. July 18. Half fare to Columbia, S. C., 110 miles, $3.25. July 19. Half fare to Augusta, Ga., 143 miles, $3.25, half to Atlanta, 171 miles, $4.00, and full fare from Atlanta to La Grange, 71 miles, $3.50. Arrived at La Grange, my birthplace, 11 o'clock at night, and went to my sister's, Mrs. M. C. Huntley's. July 21. Anniversary of Battle of Manassas. Hired Tommy Davis to drive me to Greenville, going 20 miles in 6 1/2 hours. Had a joyful meeting with my mother and sister. July 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30. Happy days at home, sweet home, with the dearest of mot
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The red Artillery. (search)
slaughtered animals that were used to cover the saddletrees made of timber, cut by temporary details of men from the army in the field. As the war continued, efforts were made to build permanent and well appointed arsenals, as at Macon and Augusta, Ga. The large arsenal at Augusta, under the management of Colonel Rains, was especially devoted to the manufacture of powder. Toward the close of the war it was making an abundant supply of very superior character, equal and in some respects sAugusta, under the management of Colonel Rains, was especially devoted to the manufacture of powder. Toward the close of the war it was making an abundant supply of very superior character, equal and in some respects superior to that imported from foreign countries. Under the demands of necessity, in many instances, cotton converted into rubber cloth was used in the manufacture of infantry accoutrements, and was found especially useful in making belts for machinery. Models of inventions were frequently sent to the arsenal, of which large numbers were valueless, and those good in theory could not be tried for want of skilled machinists and ordnance supplies. I remember on one occasion—the last year of t