hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 123 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 75 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 75 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 47 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 44 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Perryville (Kentucky, United States) or search for Perryville (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
d Richmond, and Chancellorsville, and in the Valley, the shield of the west bore all the tests of as high a resolution, and of as noble endurance at Shiloh, and Perryville, and Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga, down to those last days when a remnant under Gibson held Canby and his 40,000 veterans in check at Spanish Fort. If the Aon and drilling. Bragg himself acknowledges the Fifth unexcelled therein, even by his famous battery. We march into Kentucky. Mumfordsville is captured and Perryville is fought. The White Horse Battery is known to friend and foe thereafter, and clamorous and enthusiastic recognition salutes it in the streets of Harrodsburg ft was a drawn battle—and sadly the Potomac was recrossed at Shepherdstown. The fifth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated attacks of the Federal troops For the foe h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Army of Tennessee. (search)
men who did it! When the Southern Confederacy took the attitude of a combatant, it was with sword and shield. She chose to employ the Army of Northern Virginia as the sword of her right hand; while in her left the Western army guarded 1,000 miles of front. If glory gleamed from our flashing falchion in the east at Manassas, and Richmond, and Chancellorsville, and in the Valley, the shield of the west bore all the tests of as high a resolution, and of as noble endurance at Shiloh, and Perryville, and Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga, down to those last days when a remnant under Gibson held Canby and his 40,000 veterans in check at Spanish Fort. If the Army of Northern Virginia was the sword of the Lord and of Gideon—sheathed by the mighty hand of Lee at Appomattox—verily, when the weeping eyes of our women were turned to where you guarded so long and well, the heart of the Confederacy, through the noise of the lamentation, a voice went up, crying, This is, indeed, my shield and my
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
th comes next and Farmington. Incessant picket fighting, dire disease, wretched rations, and death dealing water. A crucial test, which the strongest and bravest alone survived. A school, withal, which tempered us for the worst that could arise. Tupelo is reached, and Slocomb now commands. Suffering is forgotten in recuperation and drilling. Bragg himself acknowledges the Fifth unexcelled therein, even by his famous battery. We march into Kentucky. Mumfordsville is captured and Perryville is fought. The White Horse Battery is known to friend and foe thereafter, and clamorous and enthusiastic recognition salutes it in the streets of Harrodsburg from the army passing in retreat. Those shouts shall ever ring in the ears of its survivors. Through Cumberland Gap, half starving and worn, retreating steps now take us to Kingston's snow-clad fields. We meet the first blasts of a winter campaign. Our tents are finally pitched in winter quarters on Harpeth's frozen banks, wher
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
h the high hope of winning peace upon the soil of that State, but, alas, at Sharpsburg, from early morn till dewy eve, we fought till To the right, to the left and around, and around, Death whirled in its dance on the bloody ground, 'Till God's sunlight was quenched in fiery fight, And over the hosts fell brooding night. It was a drawn battle—and sadly the Potomac was recrossed at Shepherdstown. The fifth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated attacks of the Federal troops For the foe had crossed from the other side That day, in the face of a murderous fire That swept them down in its terrible ire: And their life-blood went to color the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
evented. Battle of Perryville. General Buell, learning the position of our forces near Perryville, determined on attacking us there. Bragg wisely prepared to receive and give him battle, and,nder the immediate command of Buell, then rapidly, and, as they thought, securely, approaching Perryville, hoping to crush them in detail, and thereby remain for a time at least master of the situatioghtly harrassed, passed on and in time united with Buell's forces, then being driven back from Perryville, and turned the tide of battle against us, which, till his arrival, had rolled so proudly at oe suppressed its utterance, that General Bragg's original plan was not to engage the enemy at Perryville, but, on the other hand, if his orders had been obeyed, the battle field would have been elsewisk of life or capture to join and resume immediate command of his troops near Harrodsburg and Perryville, and make an effort to repair the mistakes of his subordinate. Hence the battle of Perryville