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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 120 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 104 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 8 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 79 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 77 77 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 73 73 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 51 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 50 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) or search for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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ence to a vote of the majority, which they had opposed. Mr. Johnson, of Arkansas, now announced the withdrawal, after due consideration and consultation, of the remainder of the delegation from his State; but Mr. F. B. Flournoy gave notice that he did not concur in this action The formal protest and withdrawal of ten delegates from Louisiana was now presented. It states that these delegates act in obedience to a resolution passed by the Democracy of Louisiana in State Convention at Baton Rouge, March 5, 1860, in the following words: Resolved, That the Territories of the United States belong to the several States as their common property, and not to individual citizens thereof; that the Federal Constitution recognizes property in slaves; and, as such, the owner thereof is entitled to carry his slaves into any Territory in the United States; to hold them there as property; and, in case the people of the Territories, by inaction, unfriendly legislation or otherwise, should end
thereafter: Yeas 84; Nays 15. Mississippi having, next to South Carolina, the largest proportional Slave population of any State in the Union, it is probable that this action more nearly conformed to the real sentiment of her reading, governing class, than that of any other State which is claimed as having seceded. In Louisiana, Gov. Thomas O. Moore, an extensive planter and slaveholder, cherishing the prejudices of his class, called November 26, 1860. her new Legislature to meet at Baton Rouge, December 10th. This lost no time in calling December 17, 1860. a Convention, by which an Ordinance of Secession was passed January 26, 1860. Yeas 103; Nays 17. But a New Orleans journal, which had not yet fallen into treason, confidently asserted that a majority of the people who voted for delegates to that Convention had voted for Union delegates, and challenged the Secessionists to publish and scrutinize the popular vote. This they were finally impelled to do, figuring out a s
sserting that the attempt to reinforce Fort Sumter was a violation of the promises of the Executive. The Star of the West, having 250 soldiers and ample provisions on board, appeared off the bar at Charleston on the 9th. Attempting to steam up the harbor to Fort Sumter, she was fired upon from Fort Moultrie and a battery on Morris Island, and, being struck by a shot, put about, and left for New York, without even communicating with Major Anderson. In Louisiana, the Federal arsenal at Baton Rouge was seized by order of Gov. Moore on the 11th. Forts Jackson and St. Philip, commanding the passage up the Mississippi to New Orleans, and Fort Pike, at the entrance of Lake Pontchartrain, were likewise seized and garrisoned by State troops. The Federal Mint and Custom-House at New Orleans were left untouched until February 1st, when they, too, were taken possession of by the State authorities. In St. Louis, the Custom-House, Sub-Treasury, and Post Office were garrisoned by a handful
to Washington, 411. Barringer, Daniel M., of N. C., in the Peace Conference, 401. Barron, Com. S., surrenders at Hatteras, 600. Barrow, Washington, Commissioner to the Confederacy from Gov. Harris. 482. Barry, Major, on the battle of Bull Run, 545. Barry, Mr., of Miss., withdraws from the Dem. Convention at Charleston, 314. Bartow, Gen., killed at Bull Run, 543; 545. Bates, Edward, of Mo., 247; in the Chicago Convention, 321; in President Lincoln's Cabinet, 423. Baton Rouge, La., Arsenal seized at, 412; 490. Bayard, James A., (father,) 107. Bayard, James A., (son,) 315; presides at the Seceders' Convention, 317, on Secession, 350; 437; 562. Beaufort, S. C., captured by Federals, 605. Beauregard, Gen. G. P. T., 442; demands the surrender of Fort Sumter, 443; proclamation by, 534; commands the Rebels at Bull Run, 539; his official report, 541 to 546; 551. Beckwith, Major, at Lexington, Mo., 588. Bedford, Pa., fugitive-slave arrests near, 216.