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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 120 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 104 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 8 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 79 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 77 77 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 73 73 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 51 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 50 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) or search for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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t period until the majesty of the Government was made manifest, immediately after you had assumed the chief magistracy, the conspirators against its Constitution and laws have left nothing undone to perpetuate the memory of their infamy. Revenue steamers have been deliberately betrayed by their commanders, or, where treason could not be brought to consummate the defection, have been overpowered by rebel troops at the command of disloyal governors. The Government arsenals at Little Rock, Baton Rouge, Mount Vernon, Appalachicola, Augusta, Charleston, and Fayetteville, the ordnance depot at San Antonio, and all the other Government works in Texas, which served as the depots of immense stores of arms and ammunition, have been surrendered by the commanders or seized by disloyal hands. Forts Macon, Caswell, Johnson, Clinch, Pulaski, Jackson, Marion, Barrancas, McKee, Morgan, Gaines, Pike, Macomb, St. Phillip, Livingston, Smith, and three at Charleston, Oglethorpe barracks, Barrancas barr
d States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a war garrison of 5,430 men. We find, as was shown here the other day, and as has been shown on former occasions, that the State of South Carolina seceded, or attempted to secede, from this confederacy of St
e to obtain record evidence of the action of the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and therefore state the action of their several State Conventions from memory. In regard to the first named, the course adopted was similar to that of Georgia. In Louisiana the Governor was authorized, as his judgment should direct, to transfer to the Government of the Confederate States the arms and other public property captured from the United States. The forts and arsenal at Baton Rouge have been occupied by the Confederate troops, and a portion of the arms in that arsenal has been transferred. The action of Florida was generally the same. In Mississippi no arms or munitions of war were captured from the United States, but those obtained by purchase before her secession have been used to supply troops furnished on requisition for the Confederate service — say ten or eleven regiments now employed beyond the limits of the State. The only public property within the lim
you to take any action, or do any thing not legal or proper to be done under the circumstances; but, nevertheless, would respectfully suggest the following as both legal and proper, viz.: 1. To call the Legislature together at once, for the purpose of placing the State in a condition to enable you to suppress insurrection or repel invasion. 2. To send an agent to the Governor of Louisiana, (or further, if necessary,) to ascertain if mortars and siege guns could be obtained from Baton Rouge, or other points. 3. To send an agent to Liberty, to see what is there, and to put the people of that vicinity on their guard, to prevent its being garrisoned, as several United States troops will be at Fort Leavenworth, from Kearney, in ten or fifteen days from this time. 4. Publish a proclamation to the people of the State, warning them that the President has acted illegally in calling out troops, thus arrogating to himself the war-making power; that he has illegally ordered the s