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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 120 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 104 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 8 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 79 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 77 77 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 73 73 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 51 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 50 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 47 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) or search for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 46 results in 9 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. (search)
Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. Lieutenant-Colonel Keith's official report. camp Twenty-First Indiana volunteers, Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of Baton Rouge, July--, 1862. James W. McMillin, Colonel Twenty-first Indiana Volunteers, Commanding Post: sir: In obedience to order of Lieut.-Col. Clark, Sixth Michigan volunteers, then commanding post, I, with forty of McGee's cavalry, under Capt. McGee, started from the camp of the Twenty-first Indiana volunteers, at seven o'clock P. M., of the twenty-seventh of June, to make such reconnoissance as in my opinion seemed best. Following the Greensburgh road nineteen miles, we crossed to the Camp Moore road by an unfrequented path, distance six miles. Nine miles from where this path intersected the lastnamed road we breakfasted and fed our horses. At eight o'clock A. M. we resumed our march twelve miles further, in the direction of Camp Moore; then we crossed to the Greenburgh road, capturing on the way a guerrilla. On arriving at the road we capture
report. headquarters Second regiment, Baton Rouge, August 6. Captain: I have the honor to lows: headquarters United States forces, Baton Rouge, La., August 6, 1862. General: In reply to ing of this brigade, in the battle before Baton Rouge, La., on the morning of the fifth inst., marketer's report. U. S. Gunboat Essex, off Baton Rouge, August 6, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secrety at Baton Rouge: flag-ship Hartford, Baton Rouge, August 7, 1862. sir: It is one of the he fourth instant I sent the Tennessee up to Baton Rouge with provisions for Commodore Porter and tht the enemy had made a combined attack upon Baton Rouge by the ram and two gunboats, Webb and Musicbined attack with General Breckinridge upon Baton Rouge, but her port engine broke down; they repaiams, commanding Second brigade, in camp, at Baton Rouge. The victorious achievement — the repulsde to suffer and feel. Our gallant army at Baton Rouge, in their first battle, have behaved like v[15 more...]
ur gallant conduct in the late operations. Baton Rouge, from the character of the ground, could no down the river, having ample time to reach Baton Rouge at the appointed hour. When she arrived within fifteen miles of Baton Rouge, her starboard engine broke down. Repairs were immediately comme, General Breckinridge opened the attack on Baton Rouge. A messenger was despatched at eight o'cloansas proceeded to a point five miles above Baton Rouge, when she was cleared for action. We leailes from the Crescent City, and sixty from Baton Rouge. This point--one of those railroad mushroo It was now announced that a descent upon Baton Rouge, and the possession of the Mississippi Rivean Dorn that he would be prepared to attack Baton Rouge at daylight the following morning. Gen. Vafficer of the confederate forces outside of Baton Rouge. This was from Col. Cahill, and disclaimedhe Quartermaster's Department, proceeded to Baton Rouge, under a flag of truce, for the purpose of [1 more...]
the restoration of free speech, a free press, and protection to liberty and property! Doc. 108.-surrender of Natchez, Miss. Official correspondence. United States steamer Iroquois, at anchor off Natchez, Miss., May 12. sir: In advance of the squadron now coming up the Mississippi, I am instructed by the flag-officer to demand the surrender of the city of Natchez to the naval forces of the United States. The same terms will be accorded as those granted to New-Orleans and Baton Rouge. The rights and property of all peaceable citizens shall be respected, but all property in this city belonging to the so-called confederate States must be delivered up, and the flag of the United States must wave unmolested and respected over your town. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jas. S. Palmer, Commander. To His Honor the Mayor of Natchez. To this communication the Mayor was directed to make the following reply: Mayors office, Natchez, Miss., May 13. sir: Your c
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 108.-surrender of Natchez, Miss. (search)
Doc. 108.-surrender of Natchez, Miss. Official correspondence. United States steamer Iroquois, at anchor off Natchez, Miss., May 12. sir: In advance of the squadron now coming up the Mississippi, I am instructed by the flag-officer to demand the surrender of the city of Natchez to the naval forces of the United States. The same terms will be accorded as those granted to New-Orleans and Baton Rouge. The rights and property of all peaceable citizens shall be respected, but all property in this city belonging to the so-called confederate States must be delivered up, and the flag of the United States must wave unmolested and respected over your town. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jas. S. Palmer, Commander. To His Honor the Mayor of Natchez. To this communication the Mayor was directed to make the following reply: Mayors office, Natchez, Miss., May 13. sir: Your communication of the twelfth instant has been received by me and laid before the Board of Se
Doc. 133.-operations at Bayou Sara, La. Report of Captain Craven. United States steam sloop Brooklyn, off Vicksburgh, June 22, 1862. sir: In obedience to your orders of the thirteenth instant, I left Baton Rouge, on my way up the river, at one P. M. of that day. On the fourteenth, at nine P. M., I sent the marine guard and a party of seamen, in all about one hundred men, under charge of Lieut. Lowry, on shore at Bayou Sara, for the purpose of destroying the telegraphic apparatuthe Parish, was hit two or three times--one shot having temporarily disabled one of her boilers. Yesterday morning I sent the Oneida and Winona to look after those places. To-morrow I shall send the Katahdin to convoy the two boats as far as Baton Rouge, or until she meets you. Here, at Vicksburgh, the rebels appear to be quite busy in extending and fortifying their works, and it is said that they have some ten thousand troops gathered in and about the town. Very respectfully, your ob't se
Indiana, Sixth Michigan, a section of Everett's battery and McGee's cavalry, and taking with me the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Ninth Connecticut, Seventh Vermont and Fourth Wisconsin, regular Nims's battery and two sections of Everett's, I left Baton Rouge on the morning of the twentieth of June; arrived off Elles Cliff in the afternoon of the twenty-second, where I found three gunboats awaiting my approach. To cover the transports in passing the cliffs I landed, so as to occupy all the woods le fight. The navigation of the river with large ships had to be made with extreme caution, and rendered it necessary to come to anchor at night, so that our progress up the river was very slow. A part of our fleet was left at New-Orleans and Baton Rouge, but a majority of the vessels were brought up the river. On the twenty-sixth instant the bomb-flotilla opened fire on the batteries, but met with very little response. Their labors, however, only continued during daylight. The nature of
Doc. 152.-the Essex and Arkansas. Report of Commander Porter. United States gunboat Essex, off Baton Rouge, August 1, 1862. To the Honorable Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: Permit me to draw your attention to some facts relating to this ship running the blockade at Vicksburgh. These facts will relate principally to the manner in which she is plated; but in their detail it will be necessary to enter into a statement of all the circumstances connected with my running the blockade. At six A. M. on the morning of the fifteenth of July we heard heavy firing up the Yazoo, and as I had the evening previously taken on board two deserters from Vicksburgh, who had stated that the Arkansas ram was ready to come down the river, (they were sent on board the flag-ship Benton,) I suspected this vessel was making her way down, and I prepared for action. I beg to state that on my passage from Cairo to Vicksburgh, my port boiler had burst one of the bottom sheets, and we
Doc. 177.-bombardment of Donaldsonville Flag-officer Farragut's despatch. United States flag-ship Hartford, New-Orleans, August 10, 1862. sir: I regret to inform the Department that at the town of Donaldsonville, on the Mississippi, they have pursued a uniform practice of firing upon our steamers passing up and down the river. I sent a message to the inhabitants that if they did not discontinue this practice I would destroy their town. The last time I passed up to Baton Rouge to the support of the army, I anchored about six miles above Donaldsonville, and heard them firing upon the vessels coming up; first upon the Sallie Robinson and next upon the Brooklyn. In the latter case they made a mistake, and it was so quickly returned that they ran away. The next night they fired again — upon the St. Charles. I therefore ordered them to send their women and children out of town, as I certainly intended to destroy it on my way down the river; and I fulfilled my promise to a