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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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! He said his headquarters were in the saddle, But Stonewall Jackson made him skedaddle. Then Mac was recalled, but after Antietam, Hurrah! Hurrah! Then Mac was recalled, but after Antietam Abe gave him a rest, he was too slow to beat 'em. Oh, Burnside then he tried his luck, Hurrah! Hurrah! Oh, Burnside then he tried his luck, But in the mud so fast got stuck. Then Hooker was taken to fill the bill, Hurrah! Hurrah! Then Hooker was taken to fill the bill, But he got a black eye at Chancellorsville. Next came General Meade, a slow old plug, Hurrah! Hurrah! Next came General Meade, a slow old plug, For he let them away at Gettysburg. I think that there were other verses, and some of the above may have got distorted with the lapse of time. But they are essentially correct. Here is the revised prayer of the soldier while on the celebrated Mud march of Burnside: Now I lay me down to sleep In mud that's many fathoms deep; If I'm not here when you awake, Just hunt me up
t been relieved by the regular rests usually allowed, the men stiffened up so much that, with their equipments on, they could hardly arise without assistance, and, goaded by their stiffened cords and tired muscles and swollen or chafed feet, made wry faces for the first few rods after the column started. In this manner they plodded on until ordered into camp for the night, or perhaps doublequicked into line of battle. During that dismal night retreat of the Army of the Potomac from Chancellorsville, a little event occurred which showed what a choleric man General Meade was on occasion, and to what an exhausted bodily condition the rigors of a campaign often reduced men. While the general was sitting with General Warren at one of those camp-fires always found along the line of march after nightfall, a poor jaded, mud-bedraggled infantrymen came straggling and stumbling along the roadside, scarcely able, in his wet and wearied condition, to bear up under his burden of musket and equ
for yokes, and Captain Ford of a Wisconsin regiment, who had had experience in such work, was detailed to break in the steers to yoke and draft. The captain spent all winter and the following spring in perfecting the Bull train, as it was called. The first serious set-back the plan received resulted from feeding the steers with unsoaked hard bread, causing several of them to swell up and die; but the general was not yet ready to give up the idea, and so continued the organization. Chancellorsville battle came when all the trains remained in camp. But the day of trial was near. When the army started on the Gettysburg campaign, Captain Ford put his train in rear of the corps wagon-train, and started, with the inevitable result. The mules and horses walked right away from the oxen, in spite of the goading and lashing and yelling of their drivers. By nightfall they were doomed to be two or three miles behind the main train — an easy prey for Mosby's guerilla band. At last the
352-53 Bristoe Station, Va., 367 Brown, Joseph W., 403 Buchanan, James, 18-19,395 Buell, Don Carlos, 405 Bugle calls, 165-66, 168-69, 172, 176-78,180-97,336-38 Burgess' Tavern, Va., 313 Burnside, Ambrose E., 71-72,100, 260-61 Butterfield, Daniel, 257 Cambridge, Mass., 45,199,394 Camp Andrew, 44 Camp Barry, 189 Camp Cameron, 44-45 Canton, Mass., 270 Carr, J. B., 347 Carrington, Henry B., 160-61 Centreville Heights, Va., 367 Century Magazine, 407-8 Chancellorsville, 71, 331,349,388 Chattanooga, 262,270,362,403 Chicago, 135 City Point, Va., 115, 121,320,350-51 Clemens, Samuel, 106 Cold Harbor, 238 Committee on Military Affairs, 315 Confederate States Army. Armies: Army of Northern Virginia, 235, 406-7; State Troops, Infantry: 1st Georgia, 270 Copperheads, 20 Corps badges, 250-68,368 Corse, John M., 400-401 Covington, Ky., 100 Crook, George, 267 Culpeper, Va., 317,353 Davis, Jefferson, 64 Davis, W. S., 329