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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 49 results in 6 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
ke him he was bold, bluff, and energetic, and, as with Blucher, his loyalty to the cause he adopted was a passion. The grim old soldier whom Wellington welcomed at Waterloo smoked, swore, and drank at seventy, and just there the resemblance ceased. Above others, on either side, Jackson understood the great value of celerity in military movements, and his infantry was termed foot cavalry. To be under heavy fire, he said, filled him with a delicious excitement. His death afterward, at Chancellorsville, lost the South Gettysburg; for General Lee has said, Had I Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg I would have won a great victory. He was a blazing meteor of battle; his enterprising and aggressive spirit sought relief in motion-always motion. To such a commander the defense of the beautiful Valley of Virginia was intrusted. After his return from Romney he was at Winchester, then Woodstock, some forty miles below, then following Shields from Strasburg, and on March 23d attacked him
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
ce in two lines: Jackson on the left and A. P. Hill on the right of the first line, the former being supported by D. H. Hill and the latter by Longstreet. This movement rapidly and successfully executed would unmask the new bridge on the Chickahominy below, by means of which General Lee could reunite the left wing of his army with Huger's and Magruder's divisions on its right bank. The strategy was a repetition of that adopted by McDowell at the first Manassas, and afterward by Lee at Chancellorsville. After A. P. Hill drove the Federals out of Mechanicsville he found himself in front of the strongly intrenched lines on Beaver Dam, and the remainder of the afternoon of the 26th was occupied in attempting to carry them, assisted by Ripley's brigade, of D. H. Hill's division. The approach to the Federal position being over an open plain and exposed to a murderous fire of all arms, was not successful that night. Had Jackson been up he would have crossed the Beaver Dam Creek above the
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. Chancellorsville was the most wonderful of Lee's battles, and de He readily perceived that with Hooker at Chancellorsville and Sedgwick three miles below Frederickshad been previously ordered to proceed to Chancellorsville. And the next time I saw Jackson, says Gdriving in the enemy's skirmishers around Chancellorsville. McLaws reached Anderson's position beebouched from the forest a few miles from Chancellorsville, they encountered the Army of Northern Vit of him, at some points within a mile of Chancellorsville. Here, says he, the enemy had assumed a l's Tavern. which is about two miles from Chancellorsville. I hope as soon as practicable to attackle, and Crutchfield's guns were turned on Chancellorsville. They were immediately responded to by aribed. Stuart only had five regiments at Chancellorsville, three of them being on Lee's left and tw Heth, Hoke, and Pender were wounded. Chancellorsville is inseparably connected in its glory and[24 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
found him more accommodating than Burnside. General Lee had a difficult task: the lines of his enemy had grown stronger during the night; Slocum, Howard, Newton (in Reynolds's place), Hancock, Sickles, Sykes, and Sedgwick's troops were all before him, and on his right and left flank was a division of cavalry under Gregg and Kilpatrick respectively. The Union flanks, five miles apart on Culp's Hill and the Round Tops, were almost impregnable and difficult to turn. Lee's strategy at Chancellorsville was bold, but his determination to assault the left center of the Union army with his right corps and its supports was consummate daring. Longstreet, re-enforced by Pickett's three brigades, which arrived near the battlefield during the afternoon of the 2d, was ordered to attack next morning, said Lee, and General Ewell was directed to assail the enemy's right at the same time. During the night General Johnson was re-enforced by two brigades from Rodes and one from Early. General
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
turnpike and plank roads, which, leading east from Orange Court House via Chancellorsville to Fredericksburg, were being crossed by Grant at right angles, who was maer's Store, where their route intersected the plank road, and Hancock from Chancellorsville to Shady Grove Church. Warren, as a military precaution, threw Griffin's h other's way, just as Hooker's had been in this same Wilderness nearer to Chancellorsville. Artillery was of but little service, mounted cavalry none; no man could killed General Jenkins by his side. It was most unfortunate. Jackson at Chancellorsville had been shot down by his troops at the moment of victory, and here in thet during the afternoon a portion of his wagon train was first moved toward Chancellorsville, and the watchful Stuart, who had cavalry on all sides, at once reported tushed him in Spottsylvania, just as Hooker had proposed to use Stoneman at Chancellorsville. So on the 9th of May, at 6 A. M., Sheridan, clearing widely Lee's right,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
blind King of, 420. Bolivar Heights, 202. Boswell, Captain, killed at Chancellorsville, 251. Brackett, Captain Albert G., mentioned, 54. Bragg, General, Br, 40. Chambliss, General John R., killed, 362. Champe, Sergeant, 9. Chancellorsville, battle of, 241. Chapman, Major, William, 63. Chapultepec, battle of, 95, 205; succeeds Burnside, 234; mentioned, 240, 242, 243, 244; wounded at Chancellorsville, 254; Order No. 49, 257; mentioned, 262, 263, 264; relieved, 268; sent to 11, 224, 228, 232, 245, 246; his last note, 249; last words, 252; death at Chancellorsville, 252; last order, 252. Jackson, General H. R., 118, 123. Jefferson, Th Robert, 38, 46, 103, 104, 105, 107, 109, 269. Paxton, General, killed at Chancellorsville, 257. Payne, General W. H., 375. Peace Conference, 86. Peck, General,om Lee, 368. Sedgwick, General, John, mentioned, 212, 213, 244, 247; at Chancellorsville, 255, 256; mentioned, 318, 319; killed in the Wilderness, 334. Seminary