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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ary of War, Washington, D. C. Testimony. Annapolis, Maryland, May 6, 1864. Howard Leedom, sworn and examined: by the Chairman: Question. To what company and regiment have you belonged? Answer. Company G, Fifty-second New-York. Question. How long have you been in the service? Answer. About seven months. Question. What is your age? Answer. Seventeen. Question. When and where were you taken prisoner? Answer. At a place called Orange Grove, I think, back of Chancellorsville. Question. How long ago? Answer. In November last. Question. Where were you then carried? Answer. Right to Richmond. Question. In what prison were you placed? Answer. I was put on Belle Isle first, and then I got sick and was taken to the hospital. Question. Describe how you were treated there, and the cause of your sickness? Answer. They did not treat me very kindly. I froze my feet on the island. Question. How came they to be frozen? Answer. When they to
to the foot of a hill rising from the river. This hill is in reality a part of the river-bank, which here rises up so as to command the front for a mile or more, and was further strengthened by an elaborate redoubt, containing two twelve--pound Parrott guns, taken originally from Milroy at the capitulation of Winchester. On the rebel right, and near the railway, was another smaller redoubt, (also containing two three-inch ordnance guns taken from us, the one at Antietam, the other at Chancellorsville,) which crowned a hill but little lower than the one just described, from which it was distant some six hundred feet. To the enemy's left of the larger fortification, extended a long line of formidable, carefully constructed rifle-pits. These redoubts and rifle-pits were lined with troops — in short, Stonewall Jackson's old brigade was there. The famous Louisiana Tigers were here too. There was one entire brigade (five regiments) and three regiments of another brigade, all under comma
Burnside, General Woodbury was exonerated from all blame. General Hooker relieved General Burnside from his command on the twenty-fifth of January, but no advance movement was attempted till near the end of April, when a large cavalry force, under General Stoneman, was sent across the upper Rappahannock, toward Richmond, to destroy the enemy's communications, while General Hooker, with his main army, crossed the Rappahannock and the Rapidan above their junction, and took position at Chancellorsville, at the same time General Sedgwick crossed near Fredericksburgh, and stormed and carried the heights. A severe battle took place on the second and third of May, and on the fifth our army was again withdrawn to the north side of the river. For want of official data, I am unable to give any detailed accounts of these operations or of our losses. It is also proper to remark in this place, that from the time he was placed in the command of the army of the Potomac till he reached Fair
but he is the same who was captured at Gettysburgh, and put his colors under his shirt and thus saved them, and afterward escaped. The country where the fighting occurred is densely wooded, and similar in every respect to the country about Chancellorsville, it being, indeed, but a continuation of that description of country. During the fight General Ed. Johnson had a horse shot under him, and General Stuart was slightly wounded, but soon resumed command. There was also some cavalry fightnsville, where they will be properly cared for, it being impossible to provide for them here. You have, of course, heard of General Rosser capturing seventy wagons near Wilderness Tavern, fifteen miles above Fredericksburgh and five above Chancellorsville, in rear of the enemy's lines. He destroyed fifty, brought off twenty, besides one hundred and fifty mules and the same number of prisoners. Sunday morning, Nov. 29-11 A. M. There was a little skirmishing yesterday, but it did not amoun
ic treasury, and, above all, the consciousness of a bad cause, must tell with fearful force upon the overstrained energies of the enemy. His campaign of 1864 must, from the exhaustion of his resources of men and money, be far less formidable than those of the last two years, when unimpaired means were used with boundless prodigality, and with results which are suggested by the mention of the names of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, and the Chickahominy, Manassas, Fredericksburgh, and Chancellorsville. Soldiers: Assured success awaits us in our holy struggle for liberty and independence, and for the preservation of all that renders life desirable to honorable men; when that success shall be reached, to you, your country's hope and pride, under Divine Providence, will it be due. The fruits of that success will not be reaped by you alone, but your children and your children's children in long generations to come will enjoy the blessings derived from you, that will preserve your memo
country in every direction. Colonel Alger, commanding the Fifth Michigan, was sent on the macadamized pike to Robertson's Tavern; while General Kilpatrick, with the main body, proceeded down the Fredericksburgh plank-road to the vicinity of Chancellorsville, meeting no infantry force, and but small parties of cavalry, who fell back before his advance. In accordance with instructions, he returned to the vicinity of Culpeper Ford on Saturday night, to await further orders, and was there directtioned at Fredericksburgh. More than half the videttes have no horses, are seldom relieved, and are sometimes obliged to walk twenty-three miles to their post of duty. The rebels are represented as being engaged in replanking the road from Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House, and are laying out several new roads through the wilderness. Twelve or fifteen prisoners were captured by General Kilpatrick, and he returned to his camp yesterday evening, without having lost a man during his recon
e bivouacked near his headquarters, and the next day, a little after dark, we started on our expedition with a force of between three thousand and four thousand men. About three hours, however, before starting, an advance force of five hundred men was sent ahead to clear the ford, and draw the attention of any small parties of rebs who might be straggling around. We crossed Ely's Ford at one o'clock in the morning, without opposition, and pushed forward rapidly, passing, in our course, Chancellorsville, of historic fame, and at daylight we entered Spottsylvania Court-House. The numerous campfires around the place indicated that the Johnnies were around, but upon our approach they had fled precipitately, too much frightened to offer any resistance to our advance. On we went, stopping only at long intervals for a few moments' rest and refreshment for ourselves and horses. We proceeded rapidly, passing through Mount Pleasant, Markham, and Childsburgh. Up to this time we had followed