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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson in Lexington, Va. (search)
going to say, and consequently the strictest attention was paid. In a speech of fifteen minutes he reviewed the resolutions, endorsed them, spoke of the dangers threatening the South, the duty of taking a firm stand, and then sat down. He displayed one quality of an orator not always exhibited by political speakers; when he was done he quit. The Frank Paxton spoken of in this connection, went out the next spring as a lieutenant in the Rockbridge Riflemen, and when he was killed at Chancellorsville, held the position of brigadier-general, and fell at the head of Jackson's old Stonewall brigade. His was as dauntless a spirit as that of his old commander, and they are quietly sleeping together in the Lexington cemetery. At the request of a young friend in the town of Lexington, who expected to be absent several weeks, I agreed to supply his place temporarily as a teacher in the colored Sunday school. Accordingly on the next Sabbath afternoon I repaired to the lecture-room of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
and. By order, will. M. Barbour, Colonel Commanding Brigade. List of casualties in Lane's brigade-campaign 1863. names of battles.Killed.WoundedMissing.Total.aggregate.  Officers.Men.Officers.Men.OfficersMen.Officers.Men. Chancellorsville, May 2 and 31214959567112172837909 Gettysburg, July 1, 2 and 3        660 Hagerstown, July 13        29 Falling Waters, July 14        42 grand Total        1,640 The loss at Chancellorsville was one-third of the entire command. Enrs.Men.OfficersMen.Officers.Men. Chancellorsville, May 2 and 31214959567112172837909 Gettysburg, July 1, 2 and 3        660 Hagerstown, July 13        29 Falling Waters, July 14        42 grand Total        1,640 The loss at Chancellorsville was one-third of the entire command. Entire loss in the Trans-Potomac campaign, seven hundred and thirty-one, out of an effective total of one thousand three hundred and fifty-five (
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
the nature of the position, the casualties, and any other facts that may be of interest, which I should like to incorporate in the history of my company soon to be published. Hoping to hear something authentic touching this matter in your next issue, I am, sir, Yours, very truly, John D. Billings, Historian, and former member of Tenth Massachusetts Battery, Second Army corps, Army of Potomac. The failure of General Hooker to cut Jackson's column when moving to his rear at Chancellorsville has been much discussed. The following letter will throw some light on an interesting episode of that great movement: San Francisco, 26th January, 1881, 439 California Street. General Fitzhugh Lee: Dear General,--Accident some time ago placed me in poseession of a copy of your address of October 29th, 1879, which you ought to have sent me. I take the liberty of calling your attention to the part acted by Captain Moore, of the Fourteenth Tennessee, which I think you would have
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
er Johnson (we are not informed what part he took in crushing the rebellion ), or any one else, points out any particular in which we have been guilty of a falsification of history, we promise to confess our error, and do all in our power to correct it. But, to be frank, we confess that we should be slow to accept the guidance of a man who shows such profound ignorance as to say that Lee never won an offensive battle, [we wonder what he calls Seven days around Richmond, Second Manassas, Chancellorsville, the first days in the Wilderness, Reams's Station, etc.?], and who shows a spirit that would revive the fabrications with which Northern writers flooded the world during and just after the war, and would remand the chief Rebels to prison, or the hangman. General Sherman Manufacturing history. We carefully preserved General Sherman's speech before the Army of the Potomac, and although his new version of the burning of Columbia has been fully refuted by articles we had previously p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. The campaign of Chancellorsville. By Theodore A. Dodge, United States Army. Published by James R. Osgood & Co., Boston. This is one of a series of papers read before the Military Historical Society of Massachusetts, and gotten up in the admirable style for which the house of J. R. Osgood & Co., is famous. Our friend, Colonel Wm. Allan (whose study of this compaign and general knowledge of all of the campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, on whose staff he served, peculiarly fit him for the task), is preparing us a full review of the book, which we had, hoped to have in time for this issue, and shall publish as soon as received. We can only say now that we have read the book with deep interest and do not hesitate to pronounce it one of the ablest, fairest and most valuable books which we have seen. Colonel Dodge has carefully studied the official reports, &c., on both sides, has evidently tried to be fair and accurate, and has written in a spirit of candor a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
firing the sound was not heard within a mile of Appomattox Courthouse, or within General Gordon's hearing. Respectfully, N. B. Johnston. What Infantry Regiment accompanied General Stuart to Ely's Ford the night Jackson was wounded at Chancellorsville? The following letter from our friend, Major H. B. McClellan, explains itself and will, we hope, elicit the desired information: Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society: My Dear Sir,--On the evening of the 2d May, 1862, after Jackson's first success at Chancellorsville, General J. E. B. Stuart obtained from General Jackson one regiment of infantry, with which he moved toward Ely's Ford to disperse a force of the enemy reported to be at that point, and to take possession of the Ford. Before accomplishing his purpose he was recalled to the army to take command of Jackson's corps. Can any of your readers give me the name of the infantry regiment which was employed in this service, and place me in communi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. (search)
The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. A Review by Colonel Wtion of the Army of Northern Virginia, on Chancellorsville); his only avenue of supply the Richmond dered up from Fredericksburg, and reached Chancellorsville before midday on Friday, May 1st. Thus Hes. Berry's division is fortunately near Chancellorsville, and is rapidly sent forward to check, ifuch that the battle was already raging at Chancellorsville before Sedgwick was ready to move out frovery cautiously up the plank road towards Chancellorsville. At Salem Church, half way between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Wilcox held him in check until McLaws arrived with four brigades, abning. Hooker remained in his trenches at Chancellorsville all day, held inactive by Stuart's twenty ordered a concentration of his troops at Chancellorsville, with the intention of throwing his wholeighting since Friday morning, returned to Chancellorsville. Before they reached it a violent rain-s[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The work of the Southern Historical Society in Europe. (search)
Stuart's Report of Cavalry operations in 1863. Stuart's Report of the First Maryland campaign. General R. E. Lee's Report of the Chancellorsville campaign. Field Letters from Lee's Headquarters. General Fitz. Lee's Address on Chancellorsville. Colonel. William Allan's Address on Jackson's Valley campaign, (with maps.) Lee and Gordon at Appomattox. Hubbard's paper on Operations of General Stuart Before Chancellorsville. Pierce's Attempts at Escape from Prison. ColoneChancellorsville. Pierce's Attempts at Escape from Prison. Colonel Patton's Reminiscences of Jackson's infantry. Kirkland, the hero of Fredericksburg. Major McClellan's address on The life and Campains of General J. E. B. Stuart. Two specimen cases of desertion. General J. E. B. Stuart's Report of the Gettysburg campaign (with map.) I have also translated many interesting parts of your Life of Lee. I have also published biographies of R. E. Lee, Jackson, Stuart and Mosby, besides my larger History of the War. I do not mention these things