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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
e historic value of the book. On the whole, we commend it as greatly superior to many similar publications. We are indebted to the courteous author for our copy. The Publishers — Charles Scribner's Sons, New York — have sent us the following additional volumes of their Campaigns of the civil war: III. The Peninsula, by General Alexander S. Webb; IV. The Army under Pope, by John C. Ropes, Esq.; V. The Antietam and Fredericksburg, by General Francis Winthrop Palfrey; VI. Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, by General Abner Doubleday. Each 1 volume, 12mo, with Maps. Price, $1. We propose to give these volumes a careful study and a candid review, in which task we have been promised the aid of one of our ablest military critics. Meantime we may say that we have dipped into them sufficiently to see that they are of very unequal merit — the volumes by Mr. John C. Ropes and General Palfrey striking us as being greatly superior to the other two in the careful study they hav<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
introduction. We have published what seems to us conclusive testimony that Jackson was wounded by the fire of his own men; but we give the following statement, which is of interest, although it cannot conteract the positive testimony we have already published: Stonewall Jackson's death. Mr. D. W. Busick, of this county, who since the war has been register of deeds, was one of the soldiers that started with the litter that bore General Jackson off the field that fearful night at Chancellorsville. As a historical incident, from so worthy a source, Mr. Busick's version of the affair is worth giving. He says that Jackson was not shot by our own men. He was lying that night by the road down which the Yankees were sweeping with canister and minnie, when General Jackson crossed the road and was shot. His aid called out, and Busick was one of the men that ran to him. He carried one corner of the litter as they went through the woods, where the men were lying so thick that he steppe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
Campaigns of the civil war — Chancellorsville — Gettysburg. A review of General Doubleday by Colonel Wm. Allan. No volume of this valuable series covers a period of more absorbing interest than General Doubleday's account of ChancellorsvilleChancellorsville and Gettysburg. These were two of the greatest battles of the war, and the last, though not the decisive struggle it is often represented, marked the supreme point of southern effort, and was followed by unmistakable and growing signs of exhaustioneably with most of the preceding numbers of the series. General Doubleday's statement of the Federal movements at Chancellorsville is clear and good, and he apportions the blame for its disaster there much more justly between Hooker, Howard, and Sg up from Fredericksburg, General Doubleday sees so clearly the immensely greater blunder of Hooker in lying idle at Chancellorsville with (besides the troops that had been engaged) 37,000 fresh men in front of 17,000 worn out men, while Sedgwick was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notes. (search)
ich are unrivalled in their line, and which seem to be appreciated by a constantly increasing circle of readers. General Fitzhugh Lee is diligently at work on a History of the army of Northern Virginia, A gallant and able soldier, who was an active participant in well nigh every battle that army ever fought, General Lee wields a facile pen, and could not fail to give us a book of deep interest. But those who have read his exceedingly able and pains-taking papers on Gettysburg and Chancellorsville will expect from General Lee a book of real historic value. And they will not be disappointed. We have received General Jacob D. Cox's account of Second Bull Run, as connected with the Fitz John Porter case, and propose to give it a careful study and a candid review; but we shall be greatly mistaken if this defence of the court martial that convicted Porter does not confirm us in our opinion that they were guilty of a great outrage on an able and gallant soldier in making him the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
erybody. My boy brother, J. Rooker Lane, entered the service as a private in the Chesapeake guards, a volunteer infantry company from Mathews county, Va., and was wounded at Yorktown. After the evacuation of that place he served as a private in Company E, Fifth Virginia Cavalry, until the winter of 1863, when, at my request, and on account of his youth, General Lee ordered him to report to me for duty. As my acting aid he was always ready for any duty, and behaved very gallantly at Chancellorsville, where he was killed in the charge on the morning of the 3d of May. He was a boy of fine disposition, and by his attractive manners soon made friends wherever he went. He was a great pet at our Headquarters, especially with my first Adjutant-General, Captain G. B. Johnston. My last aid was Captain Everard B. Meade, of Richmond, Va., who first volunteered and afterwards enlisted for the war as a private in Company F, Twenty-first Virginia Regiment. At the time of his promotion he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A grand meeting in New Orleans on the 25th of April in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
ody else wants. And there was Lee, the calm, faithful, far-seeing, dauntless Lee. As a soldier and engineer he penetrated the Mexican pedrigal and discovered a route by which the army must be led. To him more than to anybody else must be ascribed the capture of the city of Mexico. We do not wish to wholly appropriate the glory of Lee but will willingly share it with those who have an equal right to it, and we would rather they should claim some share of the grand conduct of Lee at Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness, and everywhere that soldiers met soldiers against mighty odds. There was the great General Sidney Johnston, distinguished in the Black Hawk war and the siege of Monterey, holding a position in the army with a rank beyond his age and prospects the most inviting to a soldier, he surrendered everything in order to vindicate the principles he believed to be true, and came with nothing but his right arm and his good sword to offer his services to the Confe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
that offer is now withdrawn, and we return to our regular prices, which are-- Full set of Papers, nine volumes (from Jan., ‘76 to Jan., ‘82), unbound,$18 00 Full set of Papers, nine volumes bound in cloth,22 50 Full set of Papers, nine volumes bound in half Morocco,24 75 Full set of Papers, nine volumes bound in half calf,27 00 Treatment of prisoners, 1 00 Early's Memoir of the last year of the war,75 General Fitzhugh Lee having kindly consented to repeat his lecture on Chancellorsville at several points in the South, for the benefit of the Society, arrangements are being made for him to lecture in Augusta, Ga., Savannah, Charleston, and other places. General Lee's lecture admirably combines a most valuable historic discussion of that great battle, with a narrative that sparkles with good hits and well-told anecdotes, and possesses rare interest, not only for the old soldier, but for the general public as well. A rare treat is in store for those who shall hear him.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. did General L. A. Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas? (search)
Notes and Queries. did General L. A. Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas? General Abner Doubleday, in his Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (page 195), says: Armistead was shot down by the side of the gun he had taken. It is said he had fought on our side in the first battle of Bull Run, but had been seduced by Southern affiliations to join in the rebellion, and now dying in the effort to extend the area of slavery over the free States, he saw with a clearer vision that he had been engaged in an unholy cause, and said to one of our officers, who leaned over him: Tell General Hancock I have wronged him, and have wronged my country. Now, we have only quoted this statement in order to pronounce it without the shadow of foundation, and to express our surprise that a soldier of General Doubleday's position should thus recklessly reflect on the honor of a brave foeman upon the flimsy it is said, and the camp rumor of one of our officers. But the man who could grave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
town fighting one to four--fighting, falling back, grimly giving way to fight again. We saw him strike the Federal armies right and left in the Valley, and fill Washington with white faces. We found him at Fredericksburg on Lee's right; at Chancellorsville in Hooker's rear; at Manassas behind Pope, on his flank, in his front. We have found him at Gaines's Mill. Fate waited for him before striking a last blow. It was the hammer in his grasp which shattered the Federal position. Without him n the roar of cannon died away the groans of the wounded reached a heart which had a throb for every groan. Partisans may keep their bitterness of heart, but the world has spoken. The man whom they hate died forgiving all. Struck down at Chancellorsville, amid the roar of battle, he was removed to die amid the softest peace. Strong men wept like children when they saw that his last hour had come; but if they had a feeling of revenge down under their sorrow, he had none. With malice toward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. did General Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas or confess when dying at Gettysburg that he had been engaged in an Unholy cause? (search)
Notes and Queries. did General Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas or confess when dying at Gettysburg that he had been engaged in an Unholy cause? We have, in previous Notes and Queries, answered in the negative both of these questions; but we now submit the following conclusive statement of the whole case. General Abner Doubleday in his book on Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (page 195), makes the following remarkable statement in describing the charge of Pickett's Division. * * * Armistead was shot down by the side of the gun he had taken. It is said he had fought on our side in the first battle at Bull Run, but had been seduced by Southern affiliations to join in the rebellion, and now dying in the effort to extend the area of slavery over the free States, he saw with a clearer vision that he had been engaged in an unholy cause, and said to one of our officers. who leaned over him: Tell Hancock I have wronged him and have wronged my country. The frien
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