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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
n in this city: Siege of Suffolk, Chancellorsville. New York, September 20, 1864. The trinst Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville; but he found there Jackson, while Grant t's army was transferred to the fields of Chancellorsville. No such theory is entertained in any quUnited States Army, was taken prisoner at Chancellorsville, third May, and passed through Lee's armynd hence the error. Longstreet not at Chancellorsville. On the twenty-ninth of April I was in army passed to Lee until some time after Chancellorsville. His reports not being accessible, I add forty to fifty thousand stronger than at Chancellorsville, and it is only reasonable to infer that Had Longstreet wished to send troops to Chancellorsville (third), why did not this division keep tived at by placing Longstreet with Lee at Chancellorsville. If Lee, with fifty odd thousand, forcedeen overwhelmed by Longstreet. Defeat at Chancellorsville and Suffolk would indeed have disheartene[2 more...]
reet, may be defeated; but such an event is scarcely within the range of possibility. In spite of the high hopes of the South, the siege was raised during the night of the third of May (twenty-four days), after the construction of from eight to ten miles of covered ways, rifle-pits, field works, and the loss of the celebrated Fauquier battery and some two thousand men. The rebel press, with few exceptions, admitted the failure, and censured Longstreet. The Richmond Examiner, of November twenty-seventh, 1863, pronounced his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns as parallel failures, and said: It was during the parallel campaign of Longstreet against Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville; but he found there Jackson, while Grant had to do with Bragg alone. The effective Federal force at the outset was nearly fourteen thousand, with three small wooden gunboats. This was distributed on lines of about twelve miles in extent. No defeat was experienced by our arms.
Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destroy Lee. He was urged to strike before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson.
4, estimates 64,000 Southorn history (Pollard's) gives 50,000 Hooker's Army. New York Times gives 159,800 Southorn history gives 100,000 to 150,000 New York Tribune, March 26, 1864, gives 123,300 The editor of the Times had the very best opportunity for getting reliable data, and there are many reasons for accepting his figures as nearest the true ones. This paper explodes the idea that any material portion of Longstreet's army was transferred to the fields of Chancellorsville. No such theory is entertained in any quarter now; but in the smoke of that disaster it was mooted. These figures show where the rebel pressure really was, and attest the good conduct of the soldiers and sailors at Suffolk, under the weightiest responsibilities. The army should no longer be deprived of its honors and rewards because of the unexpected reverse on the Rapidan. Further details cannot be given without trenching upon the official documents. The allusions to Hooker's
General Lee's testimony. Lee, in his report of Chancellorsville transmitted to the rebel Congress by Jefferson Davis, December thirty-first, 1863, says of Longstreet, that he was detached for service south of the James River in February, and did not rejoin the army until after the battle of Chancellorsville.
share the glory with the army of the Potomac. Is not the army of Suffolk entitled to as much credit as if General Hooker had been victorious? Certainly. How that credit shall be estimated, is arrived at by placing Longstreet with Lee at Chancellorsville. If Lee, with fifty odd thousand, forced General Hooker over the Rappahannock, no doubt that with ninety thousand he would have demoralized his army. Independent of the credit of holding Longstreet's army from Lee, my command is entitledy Yard, Norfolk, and Portsmouth, two railways, eighty odd miles of track, and the navigation of the James and Hampton Roads. The value of this latter service may be appreciated by supposing I had been overwhelmed by Longstreet. Defeat at Chancellorsville and Suffolk would indeed have disheartened the people and embarrassed the government at one of the most critical periods of its domestic and foreign relations. With such defeats the nation would have had no glorious Gettysburg in 1863, to g
rence to it except, perhaps, that the cavalry bore no prominent part in it. campaign of Chancellorsville. In this campaign, my command was the First cavalry division of the Army of the Potomac, rear of Lee's army. With one brigade, I preceded the Eleventh and Twelfth corps as far as Chancellorsville. The movements of the Fifth, Eleventh, and Twelfth corps across the Rappahannock and Rapid had been south of the Rapidan river the night previous, and were then only five miles from Chancellorsville. The brilliant success of these preparatory movements, I was under the impression, gave being master of the situation, and all the necessary steps were not taken on his arrival at Chancellorsville to ensure complete success. The country around Chanoellorsville was too cramped to admitSedgwick in rear and Hooker in front; a still worse dilemma. In the third day's fight at Chancellorsville, General Hooker was badly stunned by the concussion of a shell against a post near which he
rker's store. Behind Crawford and Getty, who are on the Orange Court-house road, is the junction of that and the Brock road, up which, from the direction of Chancellorsville, Hancock is advancing to make connection. That is the vital point — that junction; to be held against all odds unto the death, else the army is severed. ia Court-house, via Todd's tavern. The Fifth corps marched in advance, the Sixth-corps next, Hancock and Burnside following. The Sixth corps marched on the Chancellorsville road, reaching Piney Branch Church toward the latter part of Sunday forenoon. Soon after dark, Saturday evening, a subdued and impressive murmur began to burned brightly, and at a distance, upon the wooded hillsides, looked like the lights of a city. Standing upon an eminence at the junction of the Germania, Chancellorsville, and Orange Court-house roads, along which the tramp of soldiers and the rumble of wagon trains made a smothered din, one could almost imagine himself peerin
eral J. H. Wilson, recently of the Cavalry Bureau, the Third. Each division had two batteries, numbering in all about thirty guns. On the morning of Wednesday, May fourth, General Gregg's division crossed the Rapidan at Ely's ford, driving in and capturing a portion of the rebel picket stationed there. This movement was accomplished by Major Hugh H. Janeway, with a battalion of the First New Jersey cavalry, and by sunrise we had taken up our line of march toward the battle-field of Chancellorsville. We bivouacked two miles beyond the famous Chancellorsville House, and awaited the arrival of General Sheridan with the First division. In the meantime General Wilson, with the Third division, had crossed the river at Germania ford and started upon a reconnoissance in the direction of Spottsylvania Court-house. At noon of the fifth we also marched in the direction of Spottsylvania, and when we arrived at Todd's tavern, which was the left flank of Hancock's corps, we encountered Gen
Doc. 69. operations of General Lee's Army. Diary of a Confederate officer. Wednesday, May 4, 1864.--Received orders at 2:15 P. M., to move by plank-road to front. Enemy reported crossing at Ely's Ford, near Chancellorsville. Camped two miles below Orange Court-house, marching thirteen miles, at a very rapid rate, over a good plank-road, which has been repaired to Unionville. Thursday, 5th.--Moved, at sunrise, down to Mine Run, at Verdiersville, reaching there at half past 10 A. M. Stopped to graze and water. Sent Captain D. to Morton's Ford to report to General Ramseur, taking two wagons with him. Firing on our right, probably at plank-road. Grant crossed, May 4, 1864, at Ely's and Germania Fords. Cavalry fighting near the river. Infantry fighting commenced. Marched twelve miles. Friday, 6th.--Colonel John Thompson Brown, formerly Colonel of the First Virginia Artillery, was killed by one of the enemy's sharpshooters to-day, at ten A. M., while examining for posit