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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
e and mill, from lonely cabins in mountain clearings, and goodly houses set in rose gardens; from Craig Creek, and Back Creek, and Mill Creek, and Jennings Creek; from Roaring Run and North Mountain; from Fincastle, Amsterdam and Buchanan; from every nook and corner, twelve full companies to the service of Virginia and the South. The greater number of these, during the four years of the war, fought within the bounds of their mother state. They fought at Manassas and at Seven Pines, at Chancellorsville, and on many another stricken field. They charged with Pickett at Gettysburg. They surrendered with Lee at Appomattox. Others of these Botetourt men, fought, as the saying is, all over. Like Sir Philip Sidney, when they heard of a good war they went to it. They fought in Virginia, in Kentucky, in Tennessee, the Carolinas, Georgia and Mississippi. The command known first as the Mountain Rifles, then as Anderson's Battery, and then as the Botetourt Artillery, fought all over. On t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
rch from the Valley to Fredericksburg—and his last great flank movement to Hooker's rear at Chancellorsville, Jackson showed the same rapidity of movement. An able critic said of him, he moved infaes, Pope reported to Washington that Jackson was in full retreat to the mountains. So at Chancellorsville he moved to Hooker's flank and rear so secretly that he struck Howard's corps entirely unprxceedingly interesting account of an interview he had with Jackson on his flank movement at Chancellorsville. Fitz Lee had been covering the movement with his cavalry, when he discovered that from across his front the order for attack was issued almost before he had read the dispatch. At Chancellorsville, when General Fitzhugh Lee showed him the enemy's left wing dispersed, and unsuspecting, hen's at Salamanca. Lee called Jackson his right arm, and wrote him when he was wounded at Chancellorsville: Could I have dictated events I should have chosen, for the good of the country, to have
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
s like a book. He became a captivating public speaker and lecturer, and his Life and Campaigns of General Lee is exceedingly interesting and valuable, not only to the student of military affairs, but to the general reader. His address on Chancellorsville, a battle the most illustrative of what the highest military genius and audacity can accomplish with greatly inferior numbers and resources, is an admirable contribution to history. He was a born soldier. Early became famous in conflicts Rappahannock. Breathed's horse artillery covered itself with glory. It was here that the gallant Pelham, as General Lee spoke of him, in his report of Fredericksburg, was killed, a loss deeply deplored by the whole army. I refer again to Chancellorsville only to say that I do not think the value of Fitz Lee's service in screening and protecting Jackson's great flank movement, and by his quick and close reconnoisance, ascertaining and pointing out to Jackson where his lines could be formed to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.53 (search)
If we had the money. From the Columbia State, May, 1901. Colonel Gibbes went to England to negotiate the cotton bonds. Some people are wont to console themselves with the thought that the Confederacy might have won if— That if embraces many reasons. If Albert Sidney Johnston had lived to pursue his victory over Grant at Shiloh. If Pemberton had not surrendered too hastily at Vicksburg. If Stonewall Jackson had not yielded his life at Chancellorsville, if— But there is one sordid consideration which is little thought of,—if the South had had the money! Colonel James G. Gibbes, of this city, the present Surveyor-General, recalls an interesting fact bearing on this if. In 1862 he was sent out by the Treasury Department of the Confederacy to negotiate the famous cotton bonds. Mr. C. G. Memminger, of this State, was Secretary of the Treasury, but Colonel Gibbes was sent at the advice of Mr. Judah P. Benjamin, Attorney-General, who had, while an attorney in New Orle<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ohn M., 239 Bruce, Captain D. H., 155 Bruner, Captain, Andrew Jackson, 283 Bullock. Captain James D. 238 Burgwyn, Col. H. K., killed, 120 Campbell, Historian, Charles, 7 Carter, Lieut. Robert R., 239 Chalmers, Gen. J. R., 217 Chancellorsville, Fitz Lee at, 142 Chenault, Col. David W 258, 276 Chenault, Capt., Joseph, killed, 279 Cheves, Langdon, 162 Christian, Hon., Geo. L., 125 Christian M D., Col. W. B., 62 Cold Harbor, Battle of, 191 Confederate Memorial Litera Miss Mary. 303 Hunter Major Robert W.. 132 Hutter, Col., J. Risque, 857 Jackson, Capt. John H., 280 Jackson, Gen. T. J. Career of, 79 How he was called Stonewall, 80 Valley Campaign of, 82 Demonstration on Harpers' Ferry, 341 At Chancellorsville 87 Severe discipline of 89 Fatal wounding of 96 Valentine's statue of, 97 Johnson, Col. Adam R., 111 Johnston, Gen., Albert Sydney, killed, 214 Johnston, Miss, Mary, 29 Jones, Col. John M., 84 Jones, Dr., J. William, 79 Jordan,