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eved by five companies of the Sixth Maine, who were rapidly thrown forward to the crest of a hill half a mile to our front. About three o'clock P. M., the skirmish-line was advanced to the foot of a hill rising from the river. This hill is in reality a part of the river-bank, which here rises up so as to command the front for a mile or more, and was further strengthened by an elaborate redoubt, containing two twelve--pound Parrott guns, taken originally from Milroy at the capitulation of Winchester. On the rebel right, and near the railway, was another smaller redoubt, (also containing two three-inch ordnance guns taken from us, the one at Antietam, the other at Chancellorsville,) which crowned a hill but little lower than the one just described, from which it was distant some six hundred feet. To the enemy's left of the larger fortification, extended a long line of formidable, carefully constructed rifle-pits. These redoubts and rifle-pits were lined with troops — in short, Stonew
operations of both armies were so masked by the intervening mountains, that neither could obtain positive information of the force and movements of the other. Winchester and Martinsburgh were at this time occupied by us simply as outposts. Neither place was susceptible of a good defence. Directions were therefore given, on the eleventh June, to withdraw their garrisons to Harper's Ferry, but these orders were not obeyed, and on the thirteenth Winchester was attacked, and its armament and a part of the garrison captured. Lee now crossed the Potomac near Williamsport, and directed his march upon Harrisburgh. General Hooker followed on his right flank, eriod of the year, over a soil that became almost a quicksand, our operations were retarded thirty-six hours at Hoover's Gap, and sixty hours at and in front of Winchester, which alone prevented us from getting possession of his communications, and forcing the enemy to a very disastrous battle. These results were far more success
possible. In person I crossed, and passed to the head of the column in Florence on the first November, leaving the rear division to be conducted by General Blair, and marched to Rogersville and the Elk River. This was found to be impassable. To ferry would have consumed too much time, and to build a bridge still more, and there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville. There we crossed Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth army corps, and leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First divisions by way of New-Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by Decherd, the Fourth division crossing the mountains to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Swe
February ninth, crossed Cumberland River at Cumberland Ford. Tenth, passed through Flat Lick. Eleventh, passed through Barboursville, and camped at Laurel Bridge. Twelfth, passed through London and by Camp Pitman. Thirteenth, crossed Rockcastle River, and camped on Big Hill. Fifteenth, passed through Richmond. Here is where we were first ordered to when we were ordered to Kentucky. Sixteenth, crossed Kentucky River at Ray's Ferry. Passed through Athens. Seventeenth, passed through Winchester. Eighteenth, arrived at Mount Sterling. Went into camp about half a mile north of town. Remained here till the eighth day of April, 1864, when the regiment was ordered to Louisville. Arrived at Louisville on the eleventh of April. Here the regiment was put on garrison and provost duty. The above are merely extracts from what we noted in our pocket diary, for no public exhibition, but for our own private use; therefore, we trust, no one will take exception or think we make them publ
were killed. I am told that Major Cole's reply was, that if Mosby wanted the bodies of his killed, he'd better try to surprise his camp once more. The weather continues very cold, and the snow still covers the ground. Colonel Wells, formerly commander of the brigade stationed at this place, has been ordered to preside at a court-martial. Supply-trains run on the Winchester and Potomac Railroad as far as Haul Town. It is said that General Early, with a considerable force, is still at Winchester, and that he has gone into winter quarters there. H. E. T. List of killed and wounded. Medical Director's office, Harper's Ferry, Va., January 10, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the following list of killed and wounded in the Independent battalion Maryland cavalry, Major Cole commanding, during an attack made on the camp on Loudon Heights, Va., by Mosby's and White's forces, at three o'clock A. M. on the tenth of January, 1864: Killed.--Sergeant J. J. Kerns, company B
this train had been attacked, and that the garrison at Petersburgh was again threatened, General Kelly ordered movements to be made in the most expeditious manner from Harper's Ferry and Martinsburgh. Of Sullivan's troops, a force was sent to Winchester, under the command of Colonel Fitzsimmons. Of Averill's command, (and I must take occasion to mention at this point that another unfortunate thing for us, added to the absence of the furloughed regiments, was that General Averill had just gone home on a thirty days leave of absence, thus depriving us of his active services,) another column, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomnpson, moved from Martinsburgh to Winchester, and there made a junction with Fitzsimmons. These united columns then moved across the country toward Romney, going by way of Wardensville. Their march was a rough and rapid one, and, although conducted in the best possible manner, failed by several hours to communicate with or get in supporting distance of Col
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 120.-operations in Western Virginia. (search)
was considered imminent, until the timely arrival of General Averill restored confidence in our ability to resist and repel the enemy, in case such attack were made. In the mean time, however, Imboden had remained stationary in the vicinity of Winchester, and it was considered advisable to feel his actual strength and force him to fall back to his old quarters. He seemed to have anticipated this plan of ours, for when our cavalry reached Winchester, he made a retrograde movement in the directiWinchester, he made a retrograde movement in the direction of Strasburgh. Accordingly, our force marched as far as Newtown, the First New-York cavalry, under command of Major Quinn, being in the advance. Some of the men having accidentally heard that the notorious Captain Blackford and a few of his men were in a certain house in town, determined on capturing the party. Sergeant Edwin F. Savacol, company K, was the first to discover the locality, although it was almost dark at the time. Blackford succeeded in escaping from the house by the rear,