Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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o this bridge. It was a day of confusion on both sides. First, the Confederates were driven back in disorder by the impetuous onslaught of the Federals. These were congratulating themselves upon a victory, when Johnston's reinforcements from Winchester fell upon the rear of their right, and threw the lines into confusion. Back across the field fled the first memorable Federal rout. The little bridge was soon groaning with the weight of the men struggling to get across it. Finally, in frantiauregard he shall have Patterson on his heels. But the aged Patterson was unequal to the task before him. Believing false reports, he was convinced that Johnston had an army of thirty-five thousand men, and instead of marching upon Johnston at Winchester he led his army to Charleston, twenty miles in the opposite direction. Johnston thereupon was free to join Beauregard at Manassas, and he promptly proceeded to do so. McDowell's eager troops had rested at Centreville for two days. The time
etween the two armies down the Valley toward Winchester and Harper's Ferry. Forced marches, sometime Valley. Jackson had taken possession of Winchester, near the foot of the Valley, in November, 1withdraw to Woodstock, fifty miles south of Winchester. If McClellan ever experienced any anxiety orces. Shields hastened to his station at Winchester, and Jackson, on the 23d of March, massed hinfederate force by more than seven hundred. Kernstown was a Union victory; yet never in history dilted on its way to Manassas and sent back to Winchester. Mr. Lincoln transferred Blenker's divisiony no means the most momentous consequence of Kernstown. The President began to fear that Jackson'sssas to protect the capital. The reverse at Kernstown was therefore a real triumph for Jackson, bu. Kenly and his men fled before them toward Winchester. A large number were captured by the cavalr There was nothing to be done but retreat to Winchester. Even that was prevented by the remarkable [4 more...]
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
d. 100 killed, wounded, and missing (estimated). March 22, 1862: Independence or little Santa Fe, Mo. Union, 2d Kan. Cav. Confed., Quantrell's Irregulars. Losses: Union 1 killed, 2 wounded. Confed. 7 killed. March 23, 1862: Winchester or Kearnstown, Va. Union, 1st W. Va., 84th and 110th Pa., 5th, 7th, 8th, 29th, 62d, and 67th Ohio, 7th, 13th, and 14th Ind., 39th Ill., 1st Ohio Cav., 1st Mich. Cav., 1st W. Va. Artil., 1st Ohio Artil., Co. E 4th U. S. Artil. Confed., 2d, Union 7 killed, 30 wounded. Confed. 27 killed, 35 wounded, 43 captured. May 24-31, 1862: retreat of Gen. N. P. Banks' command ´╝łUnion) from Strasburg, Va., down the Shenandoah Valley, including Middletown and Newtown (May 24th, 1862), Winchester (May 25th, 1862), Charlestown (May 28th, 1862), and Harper's Ferry (May 24-30, 1862). Confed., Stonewall Jackson's command, including the troops engaged at Front Royal (May 23d, 1862). Losses: Union 62 killed, 243 wounded, 174 missing.