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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson in Lexington, Va. (search)
eyes sparkling with the expectation of military glory awaiting them. Poor boyslittle did they know, as they stood there in their bright uniforms, and with their bright guns shining in the morning sunlight, how few of them would be left to answer at the last roll-call of the Army of Northern Virginia. As they stood thus, Major Jackson, mounted on an ordinary-looking horse, rode up. His face was as calm and unmoved as ever, the thin lips tightly compressed, and looking just as he looked at Kernstown and Manassas. Riding up to the side of an elderly-looking gentleman in clerical cloth, standing in front of the main entrance to the institute, Major Jackson wheeled his horse, and facing his battalion as he raised his cap, said, Let us pray. The venerable Dr. White, pastor of the Presbyterian church, then stepped forward, and baring his gray locks to the sun, poured forth a feeling prayer. It was a memorable scene! Just as the clergyman pronounced the Amen, Jackson wheeled his horse,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition into Maryland-battle of Monocacy and advance on Washington. (search)
ngton and releasing our prisoners at. Point Lookout, but the latter was impracticable after I determined to retire from before Washington. There was intense excitement and alarm in Washington and Baltimore, and all over the North, and my force was very greatly exaggerated, it being reported that you were in command, having left Beauregard at Petersburg. Washington can never be taken by our troops, unless surprised when without a force to defend it. Please send me orders by telegraph to Winchester. Respectfully, J. A. Early, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee, Commanding A. N. V. P. S.--I was compelled to leave about 400 wuonded men in Frederick, because they could not be transported. J. A. Early, Lieutenant-General. Since writing the above your letter of 11th received. A part of enemy's force has followed up to the other bank of the Potomac, but I am unable to find out whether any infantry has come up. There is no effort to cross. Hunter has certainly passed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
nia, of the ovation along the route to Manassas, Front Royal, Strausburg, and Winchester to Harper's Ferry, nor of the bloodless victory in the capture of the armory,lonel A. P. Hill, with his own regiment and the Tenth Virginia, moved back to Winchester, and preparations for the evacuation of Harper's Ferry were begun at once. nd the Third Tennessee) to make a march to Romney, forty-three miles west of Winchester, for the purpose of meeting a reported advance in that direction of his old West Point chum, McClellan. I well remember the scene on the streets of Winchester, as we marched through, amid the waving of handkerchiefs by the ladies and the shou would not advance by that route, we were marched back to the neighborhood of Winchester. Colonel Elzey, of the First Maryland regiment, was now put in command of outhe war. When, at the expiration of the four days, we were ordered back to Winchester, the murmurs were both loud and deep, and the beautiful order issued by Gener
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 2.--First Manassas and its Sequel. Remaining for some days longer in front of Winchester, and several times called into line of battle on false alarms, the private soldier was forming his own plan of campaign when our great commander received information that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas, and determined at once to hasten to his relief. Accordingly, about noon on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart's cavalry to conceal the movement from General Patterson, and put his column in motion for Ashby's Gap and Manassas. As soon as we had gotten about two miles from Winchester there was read to us a ringing battle order from our chief, in which he stated that Beauregard was being attacked at Manassas by a greatly superior force — that this was a forced march to save the country, and that he expected us to step out bravely, to close up our ranks, and do all that could be required of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
e to press forward; at one time directing an aid to order up every rifled gun and every brigade in the army. The stubborn fight between the two First Maryland regiments (the Confederates under Col. Bradley T. Johnson and the Federals under Col. Kenly); the cavalry charge at Cedarville, five miles from Front Royal, in which Col. Flournoy (under the order of Jackson and in his immediate presence), charged with 250 men four times his numbers, and so completely broke and scattered them, that other Confederate forces coming up, about 700 prisoners, two rifled guns, and large quantities of arms, ammunition and stores were captured; the gallant fight of Col. Ashby, at Bucktown, and the complete turning of the position of the enemy at Strausburg, were all results of these rapid movements which I have not space to describe in detail. We bivouaced that night just beyond the forks of the Shenandoah, while some of the pickets of our division were advanced to within four miles of Winchester.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 4.--capture of Winchester and rout of Banks's army. We were now on of Saturday, May 24th, by the direct road to Winchester, while Jackson moved his main body across toconfusion, the main body hurrying on towards Winchester, while a part retreated back to Strausburg. column now pressed on along the main pike to Winchester, passing along the whole route the deserted tion on the hills commanding the approach to Winchester. Jackson personally reconnoitered the positwe pushed them pell-mell into the streets of Winchester. The scene that ensued beggars all description. The women and children of Winchester, wild with delight, rushed out into the streets utterly rd accordingly we were halted five miles from Winchester. There were immense quantities of stores of every kind captured at both Winchester and Martinsburg, and our fellows revelled in the supplies iption, which the sutlers had accumulated in Winchester. It was the capture of these immense quan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
the blockade with the aid of their entire army and iron-clad fleet combined. On the 12th inst., Major Squires placed Winchester's (formerly Faries) four rifled pieces, near Mme. Davids on Red river. Shortly after reaching there, an iron-plated gu: Major Semmes, Chief of Artillery of Wharton's corps, having command on our right, placed in position H. C. West's and Winchester's batteries, of Squires's battalion, Major Squires commanding; McMahon, Mosely's and J. A. A. West's of his, Lennies baadiness indicative of admirable courage and resolution. On the 17th instant, McMahon's battery, the rifle section of Winchester's, commanded by Lieutenant Gaudet, and a six-pounder gun of H. C. West's battery, commanded by Lieutenant DuMay, openedod, the artillery again became engaged under the immediate command of Major Semmes. Squires's battalion, consisting of Winchester's and H. C. West's batteries, Mosely's, McMahon's, J. A. A. West's, Val. Verde, and Faries's batteries under him, consi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Fremont and Shields caught Stonewall Jackson. The day after the capture of Winchester we spent in resting on the green sward and reveling in the stores which we haptured from General Banks, and the large number of sutlers who had brought to Winchester supplies of every description. It was very amusing to see the relish with whely exhausted that so soon as he ceased his pursuit of the enemy he rode into Winchester, secured quarters at a hotel, refused all offers of food, threw himself across received this moment are that Banks is fighting with Ewell eight miles from Winchester. Abraham Lincoln. Major-General McDowell. General McDowell at once procekson, on information of Shield's advance, was returning on a special train to Winchester, the following scene occurred: At one of the wayside stations a courier was seen galloping down from Winchester, and Jackson clutched at the dispatch which he brought. What news? he asked briefly. Colonel Conner is cut off and capt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The advance on Washington in 1864. (search)
in pursuit of Hunter, and then down the Valley and across the Potomac, had caused a considerable number of the infantry to be left behind from inability to keep up, as my men were very badly shod. I had left an officer with a small command at Winchester to collect the stragglers, and on my return to the Valley, after the advance on Washington, I found that something over fifteen hundred stragglers had been collected at Winchester. Moreover, I had sustained a loss of some seven or eight hundreWinchester. Moreover, I had sustained a loss of some seven or eight hundred men in killed and wounded in some slight actions in the Valley before crossing the Potomac, and in the fight at the Monocacy. The force of infantry with which I moved on Washington did not, therefore, exceed eight thousand muskets, if it reached that number. In the three battalions of artillery I had nine batteries, neither of which had more than four field-pieces, and some of them not that many. Besides these there were one or two batteries of horse artillery, with the cavalry, the entire
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
its camp near Cedarville in the direction of Winchester on the Front Royal and Winchester turnpike. About noon, when three miles from Winchester, the Second Virginia Regiment, Colonel Nadenbousch comm move to another wood on our left and nearer Winchester, which was also done, and we remained in thaills to the east of and fronting the town of Winchester. Moving by the right flank under cover ofd the left of my skirmishers to advance into Winchester and learn whether the enemy still held the pn the Stonewall brigade in operations around Winchester 13th, 14th and 15th June, 1863: Second this brigade in the recent operations around Winchester: regiments.killed.wounded.missing.Total y my brigade in the recent operations around Winchester: On the morning of the 13th instant I marched up the Front Royal road, towards Winchester, with the Tenth Virginia, First and Third North Caroli and Potomac railroad, about four miles from Winchester, and a few hundred yards from the Martinsbur
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