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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 191 93 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 182 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 156 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 145 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 128 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 106 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 84 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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dred missing, and twenty-eight pieces of artillery and a large number of wagons captured by the enemy. Reported rebel loss in killed and wounded was fourteen thousand five hundred and sixty. We captured six pieces of their artillery. After the battle of Murfreesboro, or Stone River, the enemy took position at Shelbyville and Tullahoma, and the winter and spring were passed in raids and unimportant skirmishes. On the third of February, Generals Wheeler, Forrest, and Wharton invested Fort Donelson and demanded its capitulation. This was promptly refused by its commander, Colonel Harding. After an obstinate attack, which lasted all day, the rebels retired, with an estimated loss of nine hundred. Our loss in the fort was thirteen killed and fifty-one wounded. On the fourth of March, Colonel Coburn, with one thousand eight hundred and forty-five men, attempted a reconnoissance from Franklin toward Springfield, encountering on his way Van Dorn's rebel column, estimated at seven
they inaugurated the war, and that the exchange of prisoners has been for some time suspended. The correspondence of the Commissioners of Exchange is submitted to you by the Secretary of War, and it has already been published for the information of all now suffering useless imprisonment. The conduct of the authorities of the United States has been consistently perfidious on this subject. An agreement for exchange, in the incipiency of the war, had just been concluded, when the fall of Fort Donelson reversed the previous state of things, and gave them an excess of prisoners. The agreement was immediately repudiated by them, and so remained till the fortune of war again placed us in possession of the larger number. A new cartel was then made, and under it, for many months, we restored to them many thousands of prisoners in excess of those whom they held for exchange, and encampments of the surplus paroled prisoners delivered up by us were established in the United States, where the
clock P. M. Remained here till the evening of the seventeenth, having the horses shod and the men fitted up with clothing, camp and garrison equipage. January seventeenth, at twelve o'clock, we started into Lee County, Virginia. Marched to Indian Creek, and camped for the night. January eighteenth, moved on five miles to Ball's Bridge on Indian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. TwenIndian Creek. Remained here until the evening of the twenty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. Twenty-fifth, moved back the Jonesville road to Wyman's Mill. Twenty-sixth, moved back near Cumberland Gap. Twenty-seventh, moved back near Ball's Bridge. Remained here until the morning of the twenty-ninth, during which time our regiment turned its horses over to the Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry. January twenty-ninth, at daylight, the enemy attacked our pickets. Our brigade fell back to within a mile of the Gap. The rebels skirmished with us back to Wyman's Mill. Remained here until th
h on the tenth, and proceeded down to the mouth of Red River, where they found an immense fleet of gunboats ready for the ascent. Touching the naval force, it may be well to remark that a more formidable fleet was never under single command than that now on the Western rivers, under Rear-Admiral Porter; and, it might be said also, never to less purpose. At the time of departure, the strength of the rebellion in the inland waters had been crushed. Its forts had been demolished at Henry, Donelson, Columbus, Island 10, Vicksburgh, Hudson, and New-Orleans, by the gallant Foote and Farragut, united with the army. Its fleet had been sunk by Ellet, Farragut, and Davis. All that remained to be extinguished was one insignificant fort at Gordon's Landing, and one ram and one gunboat on Red River. To meet this force, we had collected twenty powerful war-vessels of all classes, from the light draught to the heaviest monitor. Among them were the monitors Ozark, Osage, Neosho; the iron-clad