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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 249 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 118 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 104 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 78 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 62 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Buras (Louisiana, United States) or search for Buras (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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ee companies, at first an independent battalion, were afterwards consolidated with the 41st Mass. Infantry and became the 3d Mass. Cavalry (Colonel Chickering). Of these, the 2d Mass. Battery was detained at sea and did not actually arrive until May 21. The expectation was that this land force might be employed to take the forts that commanded the river, should the navy fail to reduce them. As a matter of fact the navy accomplished it; but Major Whittemore of the 30th Mass. occupied Fort St. Philip when surrendered, while Captain Manning, with the 4th Mass. Battery, occupied Fort Jackson. Both forts were afterward held by the 26th Mass. (Colonel Jones). On arrival at New Orleans, May 1, the 31st Mass., with a section of the 6th Mass. Battery, were among the troops that took possession of the city. The 6th Mass. Battery took part in the occupation of Baton Rouge, and when General Williams left that town on June 20, in the unavailing hope of taking Vicksburg, the 30th Mass. form