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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Pit River (California, United States) or search for Pit River (California, United States) in all documents.

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tenant Hood, as the country to be passed over was infested by the Pit River Indians, known to be hostile to white people and especially to smt gone far before I discovered that the noise came from a band of Pit River Indians, who had struck the trail of the surveying expedition, ane it emerges from the second cafion and above its confluence with Pit River. As soon as we reached the fertile soil of the valley, we found and more distinct all the time, I suddenly saw in front of me the Pit River Indians. This caused a halt, and having hurriedly re-capped our on the other side of the creek, I looked down into the valley of Pit River, and could plainly see the camp of the surveying party. Its prox almost within sight of the large party under Williamson. The Pit River Indians were very hostile at that time, and for many succeeding ymson resumed his march for the Columbia River. Our course was up Pit River, by the lower and upper canions, then across to the Klamath Lakes
, of the Fourth Infantry, was ordered to take command, and I was relieved from the first part of my duties. About this time my little detachment parted from me, being ordered to join a company of the First Dragoons, commanded by Captain Robert Williams, as it passed up the country from California by way of Yamhill. I regretted exceedingly to see them go, for their faithful work and gallant service had endeared every man to me by the strongest ties. Since I relieved Lieutenant Hood on Pit River, nearly a twelvemonth before, they had been my constant companions, and the zeal with which they had responded to every call I made on them had inspired in my heart a deep affection that years have not removed. When I relieved Hood — a dragoon officer of their own regiment — they did not like the change, and I understood that they somewhat contemptuously expressed this in more ways than one, in order to try the temper of the new Leftenant, but appreciative and unremitting care, together w