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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 717 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 676 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 478 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 417 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 411 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 409 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 344 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 332 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 325 5 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 320 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) or search for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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n by special train from Harrisburgh, and will proceed, we learn, directly to Washington. It is to be hoped that no opportunity will be afforded him-or that, if it be afforded, he will not embrace it — to repeat in our midst the sentiments which he is reported to have expressed yesterday in Philadelphia. [The sentiments thus deprecated are those uttered in reply to Mr. Cuyler, and quoted on the preceding page.] The police was directed by Marshal George P. Kane, who, after a sojourn in Fort McHenry, fled in 1863 to the congenial associations of Richmond and the Confederate Army. It being considered certain that an attempt to assassinate the President would be made, under cover of mob violence, should he pass through the city as was originally intended, Mr. Lincoln was persuaded to take the cars secretly, during the evening of the 22d, and so passed through Baltimore, unknown and unsuspected, early on the morning of the 23d--reaching Washington about the hour that he was expected to
hen, therefore, they received messages of sympathy and cheer from their Northern compatriots in many arduous struggles, they could not but understand their assurances of continued and thorough accord as meaning what was implied by like assurances from Southern sources. Among the captures by Gen. Grant's army, during his glorious Mississippi campaign of 1863, were several boxes of the letters and private papers of Jefferson Davis, found in an out-house on a plantation between Jackson and Vicksburg. Several of these letters were given to the public by their captors, many of them bearing the signatures of Northern men of note, who have never denied their authenticity. These letters throw a clear light on the state of Southern opinion which induced the Secession movement of 1860-61, and are therefore essential contributions to the history of that period. As such, a portion of them will here be given. So early as 1850, James Buchanan (not yet President) wrote to Mr. Davis, complai
ll for troops — this time requiring 42,000 additional volunteers for three years; beside adding ten regiments to the regular army — about doubling its nominal strength. A large force of volunteers, mainly Pennsylvanians, was organized at Chambersburg, Pa., under the command of Major-Gen. Robert Patterson, of the Pennsylvania militia; while Gen. Butler, having completed the taming of Baltimore, by planting batteries on the highest points and sending a few of her more audacious traitors to Fort McHenry, was made May 16th. a Major-General, and placed in command of a Department composed of tide-water Virginia with North Carolina. George B. McClellan, John C. Fremont (then in Europe), and John A. Dix had already May 1st and speedily thereafter. been appointed Major-Generals in the regular army--Gen. Dix commanding in New-York. Lieut. Gen. Winfield Scott, at Washington, was commander-in-chief, as well as in immediate charge of the large force rapidly pouring into the capital and its
f Ind., nominated for Vice-President by the Free-Soilers, 224. K. Kagi, J. H., a liberator of slaves, 286; rejoins Brown at Topeka, 287; is Brown's Secretary of War, 288; killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Kanawha: see West Virginia. Kane, Judge John I., letter to from Polk, 169; his decision in the case of Euphemia Williams, 216. Kane, George P., Marshal of the Baltimore Police, 421; puts a stop to the riot at Baltimore, 464; his dispatch to Bradley T. Johnson, 465; is sent to Fort McHenry by Gen. Butler, 529. Kansas, the Nebraska-Kansas struggle, 224 to 251; admitted as a State, 251. (See John Brown, Border Ruffians, etc.) Kearsarge, U. S. Gunboat, blockades the Sumter at Gibraltar, 602. Keitt, Lawrence M., of S. C., an abettor of the assault on Sumner, 299; in Secession Convention, 345. Kelley, Col., of W. Va., in command of Camp Carlile, Ohio, 520; crosses to Wheeling, 522; is wounded at Philippi, 522; captures Romney, etc., 527. Kelly, William, at Tweddl