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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 717 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 676 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 478 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 417 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 411 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 409 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 344 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 332 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 325 5 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 320 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) or search for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
ed in review with full ranks, and led by Abbot! . . . That evening we were invited to City Point, to see a medal given to General Grant. This medal had been voted by Congress in honor of him and his soldiers, after the battle and capture of Vicksburg. And you now see the rationale of the Hon. Washburn's presence. He was to present it. The Corps commanders with a few aides, and some division commanders, were all the General took with him in the special train. We arrived about 8.30 P. M. ath the following florid eloquence: Sir! I accept the medal. I shall take an early opportunity of writing a proper reply to the President. I shall publish an order, containing these resolutions, to the troops that were under my command before Vicksburg. As he stopped, Major Pell drew a long breath and said: I thought we were sure of a speech this time, but now we never shall get one out of him. The medal was of gold, three pounds in weight; on one side a bad likeness of Grant; on the revers