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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 230 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 152 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 48 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 2 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 30 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Venice (Italy) or search for Venice (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
s Geneva for Rom. Convent of St. Bernard. Milan. Venice. visit to Lord Byron. Bologna. Loretto. arrival Day after to-morrow, Brooks and I set forth for Venice and Cogswell. Dictated, 1854. One of the persm it of above two years. . . . . The approach to Venice is striking and beautiful. The city is built, as ing, by Count Cicognara, President of the Academy of Venice, Schlegel, Mustoxidis, a native of Corcyra and a member of the French Institute, and Dandolo, a young Venetian patrician of talent and acuteness. Six pamphlets October 19.—As in all the Italian cities, so in Venice, there is little society, and the persons I have knto the tranect, to the common ferry Which trades to Venice; embarked on the lagoon, and looked back for the last time on Venice, which seems from the opposite shore to dance like a fairy creation on the undulations of th Mira, on the Brenta, and about fourteen miles from Venice, we came to the villa now occupied by Lord Byron, a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
at, in the space occupied by its chief staircase alone, a large house might be built. . . . . For two days I enjoyed walking about continually with the monks, the prior, and the Bishop of Toledo, who happened to be there. The church of the convent would be reckoned among the large churches of Rome, and the beautiful ones of Italy. The instant I entered it, its light, disencumbered arches and dome, its broad, fine naves, and its massy, imposing pilasters reminded me of Palladio's works at Venice. . . . . Immediately below the chief altar is the Pantheon, the burial-place of the kings. It is small and circular, made of the richest marbles, and ornamented with bronze and precious stones, yet in a very plain, simple style of architecture, and, from the solemn air that breathes through the whole of it, much better fitted to its purpose, than the gorgeous burial-place of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany. The sarcophagi are all of bronze, and all alike, ranged one above another to the height,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
. . I had a specimen of the varieties of French society, and at a very curious and interesting moment, for it was just as the revolution took place in the Ministry, by which the Duke de Richelieu was turned out, and Count Decazes put in. . . . . The most genuine and unmingled ultra society I met, was at the Marchioness de Louvois'. She is an old lady of sixty-five, who emigrated in 1789, and returned in 1814; and her brother, the present Bishop of Amiens, who was then French Minister at Venice, retreated at the same time to the upper part of Germany, and continued an exile as long as the family he served. I never went there that the old lady did not read me a good lecture about republicanism; and if it had not been for the mild, equal good sense of the Bishop, I should certainly have suffered a little in my temper from her attacks, supported by a corps of petits Marquis de l'ancien regime, who were always of her coterie. . . . The Duchess de Duras' society was ultra too, but u
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
isits, 386. Trist, Mr., 348. Trist, Mrs., 348. Trowbridge, Sir, Thomas, 180, 277. Tudor, William, Life of James Otis, 338 and note. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, 489. U Ubaldo, Marchese, 175. V Van Buren, Martin, 372, 409. Van Rensselaer, General, 381. Varnhagen Von Ense 495. Vathek. See Beckford. Vaughan, Benjamin, 55, 352 note, 413. Vaughan, John, 15, 55, 352. Vaughan, Mr., 209, 372 and note, 381, 382. Vaughan, William, 55, 58, 263, 352 note, 413. Venice, visits, 162-166. Verplanck, Mr., 381. Victoria, Princess, 435, 437. Vignolles, Rev. Mr., 424. Villafranca, Marques de, 197. Villemain, A. F., 131, 133, 139. Villers, pamphlet in defence of Gottingen University, 11. Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, record of his death, 438. Villiers, Hon., Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Hon. Mrs. Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Mrs., 418. Virginia, visits, 26, 31-38. Vogel von Vogelstein, 482, 490. Volkel, 121. Von der Hagen,