Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
line of the Jackson railroad. Some correspondence took place by telegraph between General Grant and General Halleck, as General-in-Chief, regarding a commander for the river column, to which McClernand's levies were assigned as they reported at Cairo, and General Grant was authorized to designate the commander, unless otherwise ordered. General Grant had already indicated to Halleck his purpose of assigning Sherman; General Halleck replied, December 9th, that Sherman would be his choice, butnd to McClernand. General McClernand, who had also been in correspondence with the Government on this subject and had now received corresponding orders direct, was at that moment on his way to report for duty. General Grant's telegram to him at Cairo did not find him promptly, and General Grant's telegram to Sherman, intended to cause him to wait for McClernand, did not reach Memphis until after Sherman with the advance of his troops had started. The capture of Holly Springs on the 20th of D
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
icers, and get a good meal on the flag-ship. Then I wrote letters to the general-in-chief informing him of our present position, dispatches to be telegraphed from Cairo, orders to General Sullivan, commanding above Vicksburg, and gave orders to all my corps commanders. About 12 o'clock at night I was through my work, and started im free to perform the functions of his office. Had I insisted upon an unconditional surrender, there would have been over thirty-odd thousand men to transport to Cairo, very much to the inconvenience of the army on the Mississippi; thence the prisoners would have had to be transported by rail to Washington or Baltimore; thence agdquarters outside in the afternoon, and did not move them into the town until the 6th. On the afternoon of the 4th I sent Captain William M. Dunn, of my staff, to Cairo, the nearest point where the telegraph could be reached, with a dispatch to the general-in-chief. It was as follows: The enemy surrendered this morning. The
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
S. N. By the 1st of July, 1862, the Mississippi had been traversed by the fleet of Davis from Cairo down, and by that of Farragut from the Passes up, and the only point where the Confederates retach attacked them on June 9th. No serious obstruction, however, to the passage of the river from Cairo to the sea now existed, except at Vicksburg. The advance division of Farragut's squadron undeorter, as acting rear-admiral, assumed command of the Mississippi squadron at the naval depot at Cairo, which was now the headquarters. He received from Davis intact the squadron as it had come fromats, Chillicothe, Indianola, and Tuscumbia. On the 21st of November Porter issued orders from Cairo to Captain Henry Walke, then in command of the gun-boats patrolling the river below Helena, to eprepare for the attack on Chickasaw Bluffs. On December 23d, Porter, who had now come down from Cairo, went up the Yazoo with the Benton, Tyler, and Lexington, three tin-clads, and two rams. By thr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. The Mississippi flotilla.--Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, commanding; Commander A. M. Pennock, Fleet Captain, Naval Station, Cairo. gun-boats.--Benton, Lieut.-Com. S. L. Phelps, Lieut.-Com. W. Gwin (Yazoo River, December, 1862), Lieut.-Com. J. A. Greer (Vicksburg, Grand Gulf), 16 guns; Essex, Com. W. D. Porter, Com. C. H. B. Caldwell (Port Hudson), Com. R. Townsend, 5 guns, 1 howitzer; July, 1862, 7 guns, 1 howitzer; June 10th, 1863, 8 guns, 2 J. Goudy, 2 guns, 6 howitzers; Victory, Act. Master F. Read, 6 howitzers. mortar-boats, Gunner Eugene Mack; Ensign Miller. auxiliary.--Abraham, Act. Ens. W. Wagner (inspection boat); Clara Dolsen, Lieut.-Com. T. Pattison (receiving ship at Cairo), 1 gun; General Lyon, Pilot R. E. Birch (dispatch boat), 2 howitzers; Grampus, Act. Master E. Sells (receiving ship); Great Western, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. W. F. Hamilton; Judge Torrence, (ordnance boat), Act. V. Lieut. J. F. Richardson
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
he advance of a fleet of transports from New York and Hampton Roads, bringing reenforcements for the Department of the Gulf. These reenforcements finally included 39 regiments of infantry (of which 22 were 9-months' men), six batteries of artillery, and one battalion of cavalry. On the 15th he took command of the department, Butler then formally taking leave of the troops. His orders were to move up the Mississippi, in order to open the river, in cooperation with McClernand's column from Cairo. Banks was to take command of the combined forces as soon as they should meet. On the 16th General Grover, with 12 regiments and a battery, without disembarking at New Orleans, accompanied by two batteries and two troops of cavalry from the old force, and convoyed by a detachment of Farragut's fleet under Captain James Alden, of the Richmond, was sent to occupy Baton Rouge. The next morning the town was evacuated by the small Confederate detachment which had been posted there, and Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
east with most of the garrison of Vicksburg. I at once sent a staff-officer to Cairo, to communicate, in my name, directly with the Government, and to forward me antransmission of previous ones. On the 3d of October a dispatch was received at Cairo ordering me to move with my staff and headquarters to that city, and report frod me on the 10th. I left Vicksburg the same day, reached Columbus en route for Cairo on the 16th, and reported my arrival at once. The reply to my telegram from CaCairo, announcing my arrival at that point, came on the morning of the 17th, directing me to proceed immediately to the Galt House, Louisville, Kentucky, where I would meet an officer of the War Department with my instructions. I left Cairo within an hour after the receipt of this dispatch, going by rail by the way of Indianapoliortified, so that they could be held with the least number of men; to Porter at Cairo, that Sherman's advance had passed Eastport, Miss. [see p. 691], and that ratio