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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Onondaga, N. Y. (New York, United States) or search for Onondaga, N. Y. (New York, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
h turret masked a considerable angle of fire of the other. The Saugus, together with the Tecumseh and Canonicus and the Onondaga, served in the six-hour action with Battery Dantzler and the Confederate vessels in the James River, June 21, 1864. Agathe beginning of the last year of the war. The latest type of iron sea-elephant in 1864: the double-turreted monitor Onondaga After having steadily planned and built monitors of increasing efficiency during the war, the Navy Department finally turned its attention to the production of a double-turreted ocean cruiser of this type. The Onondaga was one of the first to be completed. In the picture she is seen lying in the James River. There, near Howlett's, she had steamed into her firstvessels engaging Battery Dantzler, the ram Virginia, and the other Confederate vessels that were guarding Richmond. The Onondaga continued to participate in the closing operations of the navy on the James. Of this class of double-turreted monitors
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
n the morning the crew were called to quarters. The army's chief reliance on the river — the double-turreted monitor Onondaga While Admiral Porter and his squadron were absent on the Fort Fisher expedition, it was of the greatest importance te Federal obstructions and attempted to get by. When the movement was discovered, contrary to all expectations the great Onondaga retreated down the river. The moment might well have been one of the greatest anxiety for the Federals, but in maneuvering, the Virginia and the Richmond both got aground and the Onondaga, returning with the Hunchback and the Massasoit, inflicted some telling shots upon them. It was found later by a court-martial that Commander William A. Parker, commanding the division on the James, had made an error of judgment in handling the Onondaga. When day dawned the officers of the Merrimac, who expected that the remaining vessels of the fleet would soon be at their mercy, were surprised to see a strange-looking cr
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
Naval actions along the shore A busy scene on the James, 1864: army tugs 4 and 5 in the foreground; the monitor Onondaga in the offing — with Grant at City Point, the river became the artery for army and navy communication A ferryboat ready for battle Take away the background of this picture of the Commodore Perry, substitute for it the lonely shore of the Carolina sounds or the Virginia rivers lined with men in gray uniforms, and you have an exact reproduction of how this oldhe Confederate flotilla on the James, at Trent's Reach, January 24, 1865, it was the Massasoit that received the only damage from the guns of the hostile vessels and the battery at Howlett's house. In the two-hour action after the return of the Onondaga up-stream, five men on the Massasoit were wounded. She was one of the third-class double-ender armored vessels and mounted ten guns. During this action she was commanded by Lieutenant G. W. Sumner, who displayed the utmost coolness and bravery