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Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 30 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 20 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 14 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Sabine (United States) or search for Sabine (United States) in all documents.

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E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Family and circumstances. (search)
untimely death in the Troad he records. 10. Yet there was apparently wealth enough in the family to enable even the younger brother to enjoy the advantages that wealth brought to the young Italian of that day. He was able early in his young manhood to go to Rome, and to make that city thenceforth his abiding-place (c. 68.34 ff.). He owned a villa at Sirmio (c. 31), and another on the edge of the Sabine hills (c. 44). And there is no indication that while at Rome he was busy with any pursuit that could fill his purse, although, like many another young Roman, he later obtained a provincial appointment, and went to Bithynia on the staff of the governor Memmius in the hope of wealth (cf. § 29 ff.). The hope, he tells us (cc. 10, 28), proved abortive, but Catullus had yet money enough -- perhaps even to purchase a
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Education (search)
day to Athens or to Rhodes. 14. Not books, but life, exercised over him the preeminent charm. And this life was not the life of the past, but of the present, - the busy, delirious whirl of life in the capital of the world. Into it he plunged with all the ardor of a lively and passionate nature. Rome was from that first moment his home, the centre of all his beloved activities. Verona, his Sabine villa, and even Sirmio, became to him but hospitals or vacation haunts. Once only did he leave Italy, and even his joy at reaching Sirmio again on his return (c. 31) could not long detain him from Rome. And at Rome death met him. 15. In life at Rome, then, Catullus found his full development as a poet. Already from the donning of the toga virilis, so he tells us (c. 68.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 44 (search)
for Tibur was a fashionable place of summer abode, while Sabinum was noted only as the country of frugal peasant life. pignore contendunt: cf. Verg. Ecl. 3.31 tu dic, mecum quo pignore certes. tua: since the villa was a part of the fundus. suburbana: Tibur (now Tivoli) was but 18 miles from Rome, and indeed, being placed on the abrupt edge of the Sabine hills as they descend to the plain, was visible from the city itself. malam: wretched, cf. Hor. AP 453 mala scabies. expuli: cf. Hor. Ep. 2.2.137 expulit elIeboro morbum . venter: the stomach inflicted a penalty for contemplated gluttony, instead of lending itself to the expected gratification. Sestianus: referring