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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
will be attached to your squadron a fleet of bomb-vessels, and armed steamers enough to manage them, all under command of Commander D. D. Porter, who will be directed to report to you. As fast as these vessels are got ready they will be sent to Key West to await the arrival of all and the commanding officers, who will be permitted to organize and practice with them at that port. When these formidable mortars arrive, and you are completely ready, you will collect such vessels as can be sparedhe attack on New Orleans, particularly in contending with the forts on the banks of the Mississippi. Flag-Officer Farragut did not arrive at Ship Island with the Hartford until the 20th of February, 1862, having been detained for some time at Key West, where he began to arrange his squadron for the difficult task that lay before him. The vessels which had been assigned to his command soon began to arrive, and by the middle of March all had reported, together with six steamers belonging to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
heir way to England, and readily calculated when and where in the Bahama Channel we might intercept them. Meanwhile, on the 2d of November, Captain Wilkes continued his cruise after the Sumter along the north coast of Cuba, also running over to Key West in the hope of finding the Powhatan or some other steamer to accompany him to the Bahama Channel to guard against the possibility of the escape of the commissioners. But the Powhatan had left the day before, and the San Jacinto therefore returnhat he purposed to do, I earnestly James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to great Britain. From a photograph. reminded him of the great risk of a war with these two Governments supported as they were by powerful navies; and when we reached Key West I suggested that he consult with Judge Marvin, one of the ablest maritime lawyers. I soon saw, however, that he had mad e up his mind to intercept and capture the Trent as well as to take possession of the commissioners, and I therefore ceased