Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Key West (Florida, United States) or search for Key West (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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ur months ago, the functions of the Federal Government were found to be generally suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department. Within these States all the Forts, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, Custom-Houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in open hostility to this Government, excepting only Forts Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson, on and near the Florida coast, and Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, South Carolina. The forts thus seized, had been put in improved condition, new ones had been built, and armed forces had been organized, and were organizing, all avowedly with the same hostile purpose. The forts remaining in possession of the Federal Government in and near these States were either besieged or menaced by warlike preparations, and especially Fort Sumter was nearly surrounded by well-protec
tured on the coast of Cuba, Dec. 21, 1860, by the United States steamer Mohawk, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. M. Craven. Ship Nightingale, captured on the coast of Africa, April 21, 1861, by the United States sloop-of-war Saratoga, Commander Alfred Taylor, with 961 Africans on board, 801 of which were delivered to the United States agent at Monrovia. The Cora and Nightingale were sent to New York; the Bonita to Charleston, and subsequently to Savannah; and the Tuccoa and Mary Kimball to Key West, and delivered into the custody of the proper officers. conclusion. In discharging the duties that pertain to this Department, and which have devolved upon it during the brief period it has been intrusted to my hands, I have shrunk from no responsibilities; and if, in some instances, the letter of the law has been transcended, it was because the public necessities required it. To have declined the exercise of any powers but such as were clearly authorized and legally defined, when th