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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
e million five hundred thousand pounds of lead, nearly two million pounds of saltpeter, five hundred thousand pairs of shoes, three hundred and sixteen thousand pairs of blankets, over five hundred thousand pounds of coffee, sixty-nine thousand rifles, forty-three cannon, ninety-seven packages of revolvers, and two thousand six hundred and thirty-nine packages of medicine. The traffic across the Mexican border was of the same character, but there was still the gantlet to be run of the Mississippi River, now in Federal possession through the dauntless spirit of Farragut, greatest of naval commanders, not excepting Nelson himself. But the grip of the navy was closing upon the Confederate ports. Charleston was, with the aid of the army, at last closed. Savannah was sealed; Mobile and New Orleans had, of course, long before been lost, as also Pensacola. Wilmington, so long closely watched, finally fell after the capture of Fort Fisher, and then happened that which, as already expla
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
The organization of the Confederate Navy 1863--building the Indianola, soon to be captured by Confederates. The Indianola, one of the most formidable ironclads on the Mississippi River, was captured by Confederate troops on February 24, 1863. Such was the paucity of shipyards at the South, and the scarcity of materials and skilled mechanics, that the capture of a Federal vessel of any kind was an event for great rejoicing in the Confederate navy. On looking over the history of the purposes of the navy was purchased, and before the close of the first year of the war thirty-five steamers and An early defender of the Mississippi the Confederate gunboat General Bragg Early in the war, at the suggestion of two Mississippi River steamboat captains, J. E. Montgomery and J. H. Townsend, fourteen river-steamers were seized by the Confederate Government. Their bows were plated with one-inch iron, and pine bulwarks and cottonbales were used to protect their machinery.
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
lliamson are mentioned as being the constructor and engineer of the Merrimac. John M. Brooke, however, had much to do with her completion. He supervised the placing of the battery inside the armored citadel, which consisted of one 7-inch pivoted Brooke rifle at each end, and eight guns, four in a broadside, six of which were 9-inch Dahlgrens, and two 32-pounder Brooke rifles. In appearance, the Merrimac, when completed, resembled very much the Eads ironclads which had appeared on the Mississippi River. An odd coincidence was that the Monitor was commissioned as a ship of war on the 25th of February, 1862, and only the day before the Merrimac, henceforth known in Confederate annals as the Virginia, had received her first commander, Flag-Officer Franklin Buchanan. In the orders issued to him by Secretary Mallory, occur some prophetic paragraphs: The monitor Mahopac The monitor Mahopac, as she floated in the James near Bermuda Hundred in 1864, illustrates one of the newer
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
mb-vessels, and armed steamers enough to manage them, all under command of Commander D. D. Porter, who will be directed to report to you. As fast as these vessels are got ready, they will be sent to Key West to await the arrival of all, and the commanding officers, who will be permitted to organize and practise with them at that port. When these formidable mortars arrive and you are completely ready, you will collect such vessels as can be spared from the blockade and proceed up the Mississippi River and reduce the defenses which guard the approaches to New Orleans, when you will appear off that city and take possession of it under the guns of your squadron, and hoist the American flag thereon, keeping possession until troops can be sent to you. If the Mississippi expedition from Cairo shall not have descended the river, you will take advantage of the panic to push a strong force up the river to take all their defenses in the rear. . . . As you have expressed yourself satisfied
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
the Arkansas, a few well-directed shots disabled her so that she became unmanageable. Porter, seeing his advantage, loaded with incendiary shells, but at the first discharge the Arkansas was seen to be already ablaze. Porter and his men redoubled their efforts. The Arkansas managed to get near enough in-shore to make fast but her cable burnt away, and drifting again into the current she blew up. The Essex had accomplished the destruction of the last Confederate ram operating on the Mississippi River. William young, gunner's mate of the Essex Four picked men gunners' crew of the Essex received large sums. If other vessels were in a certain radius of distance or attached to the same station, they also had a share in the money awarded by the prize-courts, and an escaping blockade-runner would remind one of a hare pursued by a heterogeneous pack of hounds — the swiftest to the fore, and then the lumbering, unwieldy boats bringing up the rear. Of the fifty-one thousand me
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
fed. battery at Sewell's Point, Va. U. S. S. Harriet Lane arrives off Charleston. May 26, 1861. U. S. S. Brooklyn commenced the blockade of the Mississippi River. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minnesota begins real blockade of Charleston. Blockade of, 1861. Capt. Foote ordered to the command of U. S. naval forces on the Western waters. September, 1861. September 4, 1861. Engagement on the Mississippi River near Hickman, Ky., between U. S. gunboats Tyler and Lexington and the Confed. gunboat Yankee and shore batteries. September 14, 1861. An expedition Inlet, under command of Lieut. J. Y. Maxwell, destroyed Fort Ocracoke, on Beacon Island, N. C. September 17, 1861. Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi River, occupied by Federal forces from the steamer Massachusetts. October, 1861. October 1, 1861. U. S. steamer Fanny, with 35 men of the 9th N. Y. Volu