Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Mississippi (United States) or search for Mississippi (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

te, and not incompatible with this ordinance, shall remain in force and have the same effect as if this ordinance had not been passed. The following resolution was also reported, supplementary to the ordinance. It was at once a tribute to the great river which swept a free wave past the hall in which the convention acted, and a warning to unfriendly States bordering thereon: Resolved, That we, the people of the State of Louisiana, recognize the right of the free navigation of the Mississippi river and its tributaries by all friendly States bordering thereon. The secession measure was not to pass unchallenged. A certain result does not insure an unquestioned passage. Already, on January 15th, Senators Slidell and Benjamin and Representatives Landrum and Davidson, favoring immediate secession, had left for Washington. Twenty-five hundred copies of the ordinance bill were ordered to be printed. Then the opposition to immediate secession gave voice. Changing the countersign
Chapter 5: A bruit of peril to the city preparation of defenses Farragut at the Passes the bombardment of the forts passage of the Federal fleet mutiny and capitulation fate of the ram Louisiana the fleet at the city. On October 7, 1861, Mansfield Lovell, relieving Maj.-Gen. D. E. Twiggs, and commissioned as major-general, was assigned to command of Department No. 1, which included the defenses of New Orleans and the Mississippi river. As early as December, 186, word reached New Orleans that a Federal force had taken possession of Ship Island, Mississippi sound. In the beginning of April, 1862, another bruit came from Washington, that a powerful naval expedition against Louisiana had already sailed for the river. New Orleans heard these rumors calmly. All was alarming; and nobody was alarmed. Cradled in war, that city had stood un. daunted while the British at Chalmette were filling her suburbs with near thunder. With such a baptism of fire as hers she was
to do something, Banks transferred the troops of the expedition mainly to Berwick bay. Observing the concentration of forces there, Alfred Mouton, commanding in southwest Louisiana, surmised a march for Niblett's Bluff. Should they do this, he said, I hope it will produce a disaster; at any rate, I can make them very unhappy. During this period General Taylor kept a force of artillery and mounted men in the neighborhood of Morganza, seriously interfering with the Federal use of the Mississippi river. To put a stop to this, Dana's division of the Thirteenth army corps, two brigades, was sent to Morganza. Two regiments were sent out to feel the enemy, and were felt vigorously on the 29th at the Fordoche bridge by Gen. Tom Green with his Texans. Nearly all the Federals were captured, and there was a heavy loss in killed and wounded. The Federal forces at Berwick advanced to Vermilion bayou on October 8th, and were at Carrion Crow bayou three days later. The expedition was com
when the war began, he resolved to maintain to the best of his ability the cause of those whose rights and interests he thought imperilled. He offered his services to Mr. Davis, who gladly accepted them and had him commissioned first as colonel, and on January 7, 1862, as brigadier-general. He was placed in command of the coast defenses, including Forts Jackson and St. Philip, which were intended to defend the city of New Orleans against any fleet that might attempt the ascent of the Mississippi river. Toward the last of April, 1862, Commodore David G. Farragut with a powerful fleet of armored vessels supplied with the best guns then known in naval warfare, after bombarding for six days Forts Jackson and St. Philip and failing to silence them, made a bold dash past the forts, and attacking the small Confederate fleet of rams and fire-rafts, destroyed them and appeared before the city of New Orleans, which could do nothing but surrender. Seventy per cent of the Confederate guns wer