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The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1864., [Electronic resource] 28 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VII: the free church (search)
interesting people. He wrote to his mother, after lecturing in Concord, that he had Mr. Emerson for an auditor which made me nearly dumb at first . . . . Last Saturday I was in Boston [Jan. 1853] and went to see no less a person than Mr. Thackeray— not as lion but as lecturer. We wanted him here for a new association and offered him $500 for 6 lectures —which he declined; he was very frank about it, saying it was more than he could get in England: but he could get more in other citieslooks 55. He has very little English hoarseness or awkward breadth of voice; a very good voice and enunciation; and no hauteur or coldness; was laboriously anxious to show me that he meant me no discourtesy by refusing our offer. He adds that Thackeray's greatest desire in this country was to see Theodore Parker. A saving quality through life was Mr. Higginson's keen sense of the ludicrous. He wrote to his Aunt Nancy:— Worcester, June 29, 1858. I spoke in Springfield on Sunday,<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
tion with a swift decision worthy of your military experience? One of the dons had fancied you were a Confederate officer! In Oxford, also, Colonel Higginson saw Freeman, the historian, Rawlinson, Montague Bernard, the late High Joint, and Miss Thackeray, the novelist, by far the most original and interesting woman I have seen in England. She pressed on me a letter to Tennyson and I expect to go to see him. This visit to the poet at the Isle of Wight is minutely described in Cheerful Yestertution which differs somewhat from our Free Religious Association (as does the name Association of Liberal Thinkers). The best known people in it were Voysey (a small and narrow soul who got alarmed and withdrew), Leslie Stephen (who married Miss Thackeray), Stuart Glennie (who wrote the account of Buckle's Eastern travels), G. J. Holyoke (veteran radical), Mr. Blyden of Liberia (black and Mohammedan who has written on that subject in Fraser), Mrs. Rose (formerly of N. Y.), A. J. Eyres the phil
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
ing room occupied and almost everybody stayed through. I found reading to be far easier than speaking without notes (as I have done so long) and almost as effective; it seemed like beginning a new career and my voice served me well. Of the third course, in 1905, he wrote:— Feb. 28. First Lowell lecture (Wordsworth-shire). A great success—an unexpectedly fine voice. March 7. Second Lowell lecture. Carlyle, Ruskin, Froude, Hunt. March 28. Fifth Lowell lecture. Dickens, Thackeray and reading Tennyson's poems. April 4. Last Lowell lecture. Considered very successful and was pronounced by John Lowell the best he ever heard in that hall. In May, 1903, he spoke at the Concord Emerson celebration:— Meeting good and my address successful. After it, Senator Hoar turned to me and said, grasping my hand, What I have to say is pewter and tinsel compared to that. His position as chairman of the Harvard Visiting Committee on English Literature he resigned i<
, 118; preaches own installation sermon, 119, 120; his Sunday School, 120; and Free Church, 121-23; interest in Worcester public affairs, 123; fearlessness of, 123, 125, 312; desires great things, 124, 127; public speaking, 127, 198, 315-17; on Thackeray, 128, 129; sense of humor, 129; noted visitors to Worcester, 130-32; on a western lecture trip, 132-34, 316, 317; Lucy Stone, 134-36; attends her wedding, 137; interest in botany, 140; and public reforms, 140, 141; bequest to, 141; and Anthony igginson visits, 359, 360. Sympathy of Religions, 164, 328, 411. Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic, 386, 422. Taylor, Helen, 340. Tennyson, Alfred, 357; account of, 326. Thackeray, Miss, and Higginson, 326. Thackeray, William Makepeace, Higginson describes, 128, 129. Thalatta, 159, 405. Thaxter, Celia (Leighton), account of, 109. Thaxter, Levi, 45, 57; friendship for Higginson, 23; and Isles of Shoals, 108, 109; the Higginsons on, 109. Thayer, Abbot, at Dub
William Makepeace Thackeray. This brilliant and mordant writer was born in Calcutta in 1811. e East India Company's civil service.--Young Thackeray was sent at an early age to England, and recrary, and political efforts for that paper. Thackeray's pen found for a time profitable employmentollowing rather unfavorable criticism upon. Thackeray, yet all who are familiar with his writings re is much truth in it: Unlike Dickens, Thackeray has more genius than geniality. Where therehighest kind without genius of a high kind. Thackeray is as destitute of geniality as it is possibves at least one man well. Quarrelling with Thackeray's criticisms, do I like wise quarrel with hiperiod. Mr. Edmund Yates, a member like Thackeray, of the Carrick Club in London, gives us thee way, that called forth a sharp letter from Thackeray, demanding an apology: "Mr. Thackeray iMr. Thackeray is 40 years old, (this was in 1858,) though from the silvery whiteness of his hair, he appears somew[4 more...]
Dickens on Thackeray — a Graceful and touching tribute. The following tribute to the memory of William Makepeace Thackeray, by Charles Dickens, opens the February number of the Cornhill Magazine: It has been desired by some of the personal friends of the great English writer who established this magazine, that its brief record of his having been stricken from among men should be written by the old comrade and brother in arms who pens these lines, and of whom he often wrote himself, aWilliam Makepeace Thackeray, by Charles Dickens, opens the February number of the Cornhill Magazine: It has been desired by some of the personal friends of the great English writer who established this magazine, that its brief record of his having been stricken from among men should be written by the old comrade and brother in arms who pens these lines, and of whom he often wrote himself, and always with the warmest generosity. I saw him first nearly twenty-eight years ago, when he proposed to become the illustrator of my earliest book. I saw him last shortly before Christmas, at the Athenæum Club, when he told me that he had been in bed three days--that, after three attacks he was troubled with cold shivering "which quite took the power of work out of him"--and that he had it in his mind to try a new remedy which he laughingly described. He was very cheerful, and looked v