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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for M. E. Thalheimer or search for M. E. Thalheimer in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
B. H. Rutledge; Fifth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel R. J. Jeffards; Sixth South Carolina, Colonel H. K. Aiken. The Third South Carolina Cavalry, Colonel Colcock, was never in Virginia, or in Butler's Brigade. General Dunevant was killed October I, 1864, and Lieutenant-Colonel Jeffards October 27, 1864, from which time I had the honor of commanding the Fifth. is the Eclectic history of the United States A fit book to be taught in Southern schools?—This is a book written by Miss M. E. Thalheimer, and published by the enterprising house of Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati and New York. Its friends claim for it great fairness in its narrative, and that it is non-partizan in its treatment of sectional questions. It certainly does not call the Southern people rebels or traitors; pays an occasional tribute to the skill of our leaders and the bravery of our troops; and so ingeniously hides its poison that Confederate soldiers, or their sons, are acting as agents for its diss
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
lonel Allan has added to his personal knowledge of the events of the war, a most careful study of official documents and reliable statements on both sides, and has won a wide reputation as a painstaking, accurate, and able military critic. His paper is, therefore, of highest authority, and we give it in full (as a brief and general statement of the character of this book) before going into our own more detailed citation of its errrors. The Eclectic history of the United States, by M. E. Thalheimer. [A Review, by Colonel William Allan.] This book is one of those worthless school histories which we suppose will be written and printed as long as money can be made by doing so. The Eclectic History has been manufactured—like oleomargerine—to sell. Many devices have been resorted to in order to increase its salableness, some good, but more of them bad. It is printed on good paper and in clear type. It has a profusion of illustrations, many excellent, others poor, and one at least
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? A Review by J. Watm. Jones. Paper no. I. We propose to confine ourselves for the present to that part of this so-called History which treats of the origin, progress, and results of the late War between the States. At some future day we may take occasion to point out some of its sins of omission and commission in its account of the Colonial, Revolutionary, and civil history of the country. We will first give a few illustrations of the tone and spirit of the book, which its friends claim to be preeminently fair, non-partisan, and non-sectional. 1. Let any one turn to the account given (pp. 265-266) of the Kansas troubles and he will find that it is entirely one sided and partisan-telling of outrages committed by the pro-slavery party, aided by Missourians, and saying not one word about the Emigrant Aid So
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer, and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnatti, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
Is the Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer, and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnatti, a fit book to be used in our schools? A Review by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 2. We were noticing in our last the tone and general spirit of this book, and will now add several examples to those then given: II. Designating the Northern States (page 308) as the loyal States—stating (page 309) that more than two-thirds of the States ratified the amendment of the Constitution abolishing slavery, and on page 324 that all of the States adopted the Fourteenth Amendment, annulled their ordinances of secession, and repudiated the Confederate war-debts without giving the slightest intimation that the Southern States acted in this matter as much under duress as the traveller who yields to the highwayman's demand, your money or your life, the statement (page 313) that Mr. Lincoln, in his second inaugural address, fairly stated the positions of the two parties