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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
tus Frank, John B. Ganson, Reuben E. Fenton. Ohio.--George H. Pendleton, Alexander Long, Robert C. Schenck, J. F. McKinney, Frank C. Le Blond, Chilton A. White, Samuel S. Cox, William Johnson, Warren P. Noble, James M. Ashley, Wells A. Hutchins, William E. Finck, John O'Neill, George Bliss, James R. Morris, Joseph W. White, Ephraim R. Eckley, Rufus P Spaulding, J. A. Garfield. Oregon.--John R. McBride. Pennsylvania.--Samuel J. Randall, Charles O'Neill, Leonard Myers, William P. Kelley, M. Russell Thayer, John D. Stiles, John M. Broomall, S. E. Ancona, Thaddeus Stevens, Myer Strouse, Philip Johnson, Charles Denison, H. W. Tracy, William H. Miller, Joseph Bailey, A. H. Coffroth, Archibald McAllister, James T. Hale, Glenni W. Scofield, Amos Myers, John L. Dawson, J. K. Moorhead, Thomas Williams, Jesse Lazear. Rhode Island.--Thomas A. Jenckes, Nathan F. Dixon. Vermont.--Frederick E. Woodbridge, Justin S. Morrill, Portus Baxter. Virginia.--Joseph Segar, L. H. Chandler, B. M. Kitchen. Wes
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
thousand troops, horse and foot, the former commanded by General Carr. On the previous day General Thayer, commanding the Army of the Frontier, left Fort Smith with about five thousand men, for the eveport. The roads were so wretched that the junction of forces could not be relied upon, and Thayer failed to join Steele at Arkadelphia. The latter had been compelled to skirmish at the crossinge way from Benton, and his troops were somewhat worn by fatigue, but, after waiting two days for Thayer, he pushed on in the direction of Washington, for the purpose of flanking Camden, and drawing Prie d'anne, not far from Washington, prepared to make a decided stand. Steele had been joined by Thayer, and he readily accepted battle. An artillery fight ensued, which lasted until dark. The Confep. While his army was corduroying Bogue bottom, one of the worst in the State, his rear, tinder Thayer, was strongly attacked by General Dockery. The Confederates were repulsed, and the army moved o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ch, Hooper, Rice, W. D. Washburn; Rhode Island--Dixon, Jenckes; Connecticut--Brandegee, Deming, English, Hubbard; Vermont--Baxter, Morrill, Woodbridge; New York--A. W. Clark, Freeman Clark, Davis, Frank, Ganson, Griswold, Herrick, Hotchkiss, Hulburd, Kellogg, Littlejohn, Marvin, Miller, Morris, Nelson, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg; New Jersey--Starr; Pennsylvania--Bailey, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelly, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, O'Neill, Scofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams; Delaware--Smithers; Maryland--Cresswell, Davis, Thomas, Webster; West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley; Kentucky--Anderson, Kendall, Smith, Yeaman; Ohio--Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding; Indiana--Colfax, Derwent. Julian, Orth; Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne; Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, Rollins; Michigan--Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, Kellogg, Longyear, Upson; Iowa--Allison, Grinnell, Hubbard, Kasson, Pr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
s present, and voted. Thirty-five pronounced the President guilty, and nineteen declared him not guilty. He escaped legal conviction by one vote. The vote of the Senate was as follows:-- For Conviction--Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson and Yates. These were all Republicans. For Acquittal--Messrs. Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Fowler, Grimes, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Saulsbury, Trumbull, Van Winkle and Vickers. Eight of these, namely: Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Saulsbury and Vickers, were elected to the Senate as Democrats. The remainder were elected as Republicans. Whil