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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 7 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huguenot Society of America, the. (search)
Huguenot Society of America, the. This society was organized April 12, 1883, and has its office in New York at No. 105 East Twenty-second Street. President, Frederic J. De Peyster; vicepresidents, William Jay, Rev. Lea Luquer, Henry M. Lester, A. T. Clearwater, Nathaniel Thayer, Richard Olney, William Ely, Col. R. L. Maury, Rev. A. H. Demarest, Herbert Du Puy; treasurer, Henry Cotheal Swords; secretary, Mrs. James M. Lawton. Descent from Huguenot ancestors is the qualification necessary for membership.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jenkinson's Ferry, battle of. (search)
, tried to co-operate with the Red River expedition, but was unable to do so effectually, for he was confronted by a heavy body of Confederates. He started southward, March 23, with 8,000 troops, cavalry and infantry. He was to be joined by General Thayer at Arkadelphia, with 5,000 men, but this was not then accomplished. Steele pushed on for the purpose of flanking Camden and drawing out Price from his fortifications there. Early in April Steele was joined by Thayer, and on the evening of tThayer, and on the evening of the 15th they entered Camden as victors. Seriously menaced by gathering Confederates, Steele, who, by the retreat of Banks, had been released from duty elsewhere, moved towards Little Rock. He crossed the Washita on the night of April 26. At Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he was attacked by an overwhelming force, led by Gen. Kirby Smith in person. Steele's troops, though nearly famished, fought desperately during a most sanguinary battle that ensued. Three times the Confederates c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McRee, William 1787-1832 (search)
at West Point in 1805, and entered the corps of engineers. He was major in July, 1812; became chief engineer on the northern frontier, and was brevetted colonel for services in defence of Fort Erie in August, 1814. He was sent to France by Major Thayer in 1816, to collect scientific and military information for the benefit of the Military Academy at West Point, of which Thayer was then superintendent. Promoted lieutenant-colonel in 1818, he resigned in 1819, and was surveyor of public landsbecame chief engineer on the northern frontier, and was brevetted colonel for services in defence of Fort Erie in August, 1814. He was sent to France by Major Thayer in 1816, to collect scientific and military information for the benefit of the Military Academy at West Point, of which Thayer was then superintendent. Promoted lieutenant-colonel in 1818, he resigned in 1819, and was surveyor of public lands in the Mississippi region from 1825 to 1832. He died in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 10, 1832.
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, The close of the War (search)
pleasant to think that such a man should have met with unusual prosperity in his old age --and the person to whom he owed this improvement of his affairs was Nathaniel Thayer, of Boston. Mr. Thayer took charge of Doctor Peabody's property and trebled or quadrupled it in value. Mr. Thayer was very fond of doing such kindnesses toMr. Thayer took charge of Doctor Peabody's property and trebled or quadrupled it in value. Mr. Thayer was very fond of doing such kindnesses to his friends, especially to clergymen. He liked the society of clergymen, and certainly in this he showed excellent judgment. During the last ten years of his life he spent his summers at the Isles of Shoals, and generally with one or more reverend gentlemen in his company. He was besides a most munificent patron of the univerMr. Thayer was very fond of doing such kindnesses to his friends, especially to clergymen. He liked the society of clergymen, and certainly in this he showed excellent judgment. During the last ten years of his life he spent his summers at the Isles of Shoals, and generally with one or more reverend gentlemen in his company. He was besides a most munificent patron of the university. He provided the means for Agassiz to go on his expedition to South America, and in conjunction with Doctor Hill reestablished commons for the students — a reform, as he once stated, as advantageous to their morals as to their purses. He afterwards built the dormitory which is known by his name. He was so kind-hearted, tha
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
ev., Thomas, 3, 5, 7. Sidney, Sir, Philip, 159. Smalley, G. A., 192. Smith, Sydney, 105. Smollett, Tobias, 95. Sparks, Pres., Jared, 14, 44, 128. Spenser, Edmund, 47, 154. Storer, Dr. D. H., 113. Story, Judge, Joseph, 16, 44. Story, W. W., 16, 26, 70, 154, 155. Stowe, Rev. C. E., 90, 113. Stowe, Mrs. H. B., 65, 66, go. Sumner, Charles, 104, 123, 132, 191. Swift, Dean, 95, 166. Swinburne, A. C., 132. Tennyson, Lord, 132, 195. Thaxter, Celia, 179. Thaxter, L. L., 174. Thayer, Nathaniel, 106. Thoreau, H. D., 34, 58, 67, 191. Ticknor, Prof., George, 14, 27, 117, 121, 122, 191. Tracy, John, 78. Trowbridge, J. T., 65. Tuckerman, H. T., 172. Tudor, William, 44. Tufts, Henry, 30. Underwood, F. H., 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 87. Vane, Harry, 19. Vassall family, 22, 79, 148. Vassall, Mrs., John, 151. Vassall, Col., Henry, 150. Vassall, Col., John, 150, 151. Vassall, Mrs., Penelope, 150, 151. Voltaire, F. M. A. de, 124. Walker, S. C., 113. Ware family, 15. Wa
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), A guide to Harvard College. (search)
ll was devoted to the senior class, and it is along the front of Holworthy now, that, on Class Day evening, the year of the graduating class shines out in figures of light. One of the claims to distinction which Holworthy enjoys is that during his American tour some years ago, the Prince of Wales visited the hall, and left his picture as a memento of his visit. On the eastern side of the quadrangle next to Holworthy is Thayer Hall, the largest dormitory in the yard, built in 1870 by Nathaniel Thayer of Boston. The most prominent of the college buildings, because of its close connection with student life, comes next. University it is called, constructed of granite and completed in 1815, being the first stone building erected in the yard. The central portion was at one time used as a chapel, but now the building is devoted to lectures, and to the offices of the President, Dean, Secretary and Registrar. In the office of the President stands the ancient chair which was always use
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), chapter 11 (search)
s in the country. Both library and Herbarium are a legacy from Dr. Asa Gray. Dr. Gray began his herbarium in early life. During his service at Harvard he occupied the large house within the Garden at the top of the hill, still the home of Mrs. Gray. Roomy though the house was, it became overrun with pressed flowers. Closets and drawers were full. Even in the dining room stood cabinets filled with the precious sheets. It was to meet the need of a better storage place that in 1861 Mr. Thayer of Lancaster, Massachusetts, gave the present convenient herbarium building. It is a substantial structure of brick, and fills the space between the hothouses and Mrs. Gray's residence. Within is ample room for the herbarium, and also for the library. On entering the herbarium building, one comes first to the large room where, in cabinets all about the walls, the specimens are arranged in their proper order. Here assistants are working all the time, for the herbarium is a busy place
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), A chapter of Radcliffe College. (search)
high relief. Miss Irwin has now occupied her office one year. She has performed, in addition to her other duties, those kindly services that had in the previous years been a pleasure to Mrs. Agassiz, Mrs. Gilman and the other ladies of the corporation. It is not without interest to me that I first met Miss Irwin, in Cambridge, after her election, in the room in which I had explained my plan to Professor and Mrs. Greenough, and afterwards to President Eliot. Miss Irwin was guest of Professor Thayer, who had bought the house that I formerly occupied. The record that has thus been hastily sketched shows that Radcliffe College is a growth, that its progress has been natural and not forced, that it tends to bring to Cambridge the most advanced students among the women of the country, that it offers to them the services of a faculty which cannot be excelled for learning and teaching ability by any other similar body in the country. It has succeeded, to mention but one among many r
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 21: 1865-1868: Aet. 58-61. (search)
y wishes, my pleasure trip was transformed into an important scientific expedition for the benefit of the Museum, by the intervention of one of my friends, Mr. Nathaniel Thayer. By chance I met him a week ago in Boston. He laughed at me a little about my roving disposition, and then asked me what plans I had formed for the Muse staff of assistants more numerous, and, I think, as well chosen, as those of any previous undertaking of the kind. Beside the six assistants provided for by Mr. Thayer, there were a number of young volunteer aids who did excellent work on the expedition. . . . All those who know me seem to have combined to heighten the attthe mountains back of Ceara, and in the Organ mountains near Rio de Janeiro. From beginning to end this journey fulfilled Agassiz's brightest anticipations. Mr. Thayer, whose generosity first placed the expedition on so broad a scientific basis, continued to give it his cordial support till the last specimen was stored in the
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 24: 1872: Aet. 65. (search)
region was so interesting that it determined Agassiz to go by land from Talcahuana to Valparaiso, on a search after any glacial tracks that might be found in the valley lying between the Cordillera of the Andes and the Coast Range. Meanwhile the Hassler was to go on a dredging expedition to the island of Juan Fernandez, and then proceed to Valparaiso, where Agassiz was to join her a fortnight later. Although this expedition was under the patronage of the Coast Survey, the generosity of Mr. Thayer, so constantly extended to scientific aims, had followed Agassiz on this second journey. To his kindness he owed the possibility of organizing an excursion apart from the direct object of the voyage. This change of plan and its cause is told in the following extract from his general report to Professor Peirce:— April 27th. While I was transcribing my Report, Pourtales came in with the statement that he had noticed the first indication of an Andean glacier in the vicinity. I have vis
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