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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sylvanus Thayer or search for Sylvanus Thayer in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 25 (search)
f avowed and manifested infidelity, accompanied with manifestation of a disposition to scoff at the Christian faith and life, and this among cadets, officers, and instructors. My venerable and beloved friend and then commanding officer, Colonel Sylvanus Thayer, whose name I can never utter without a tribute of veneration and love, though not a communicant of any church, must be understood, with other of the officers, as untouched by any such remarks as the above. I had been laboring under tinciple of action. The compliment was paid them of believing they would do their duty. Two were chosen, one of whom was Polk. The chaplain hearing of it, and desirous of an acknowledgement of the reason, he took his stand beside his friend Colonel Thayer, as the companies were marching out to form the evening parade. Forth came his two beloved boys with their companions. One of them was an ungraceful looking soldier. As they approached, the chaplain said to the superintendent, Colonel, why