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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 50 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 21 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 19 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Joseph Thoburn or search for Joseph Thoburn in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 6 document sections:

10th Massachusetts Getty's Sixth 1218 134 11.0 12th Massachusetts Robinson's First 1522 193 12.6 15th Massachusetts Gibbon's Second 1701 241 14.1 16th Massachusetts Humphreys's Third 1335 150 11.2 20th Massachusetts Gibbon's Second 1978 260 13.1 21st Massachusetts Stevenson's Ninth 1178 159 13.4 22d Massachusetts Griffin's Fifth 1393 216 15.5 25th Massachusetts Weitzel's Eighteenth 1371 161 11.7 28th Massachusetts Barlow's Second 1778 250 14.0 34th Massachusetts Thoburn's Eighth 1309 135 10.3 36th Massachusetts Potter's Ninth 1073 111 10.3 37th Massachusetts Getty's Sixth 1324 169 12.7 56th Massachusetts Stevenson's Ninth 1047 126 12.0 57th Massachusetts Stevenson's Ninth 1052 201 19.1 58th Massachusetts Potter's Ninth 1032 139 13.4 1st Michigan (S. S.) Willcox's Ninth 1101 137 12.4 1st Michigan Morell's Fifth 1329 187 14.0 2d Michigan Willcox's Ninth 1725 225 13.0 3d Michigan Birney's Third 1238 158 12.7 4th Michigan Griffin'
onel William Blaisdell, 11th Massachusetts, Petersburg. Colonel Simon H. Mix, 3d New York Cavalry, Petersburg. Colonel Calvin A. Craig, 105th Pennsylvania, Deep Bottom. Colonel Nathan T. Dushane, 1st Maryland, Weldon Railroad. Colonel Joseph Thoburn, Thoburn commanded a division during the entire Shenandoah campaign, and was in command of it at the time of his death. 1st West Virginia, Cedar Creek. Colonel Louis Bell, 4th New Hampshire, Fort Fisher. In each regiment thereThoburn commanded a division during the entire Shenandoah campaign, and was in command of it at the time of his death. 1st West Virginia, Cedar Creek. Colonel Louis Bell, 4th New Hampshire, Fort Fisher. In each regiment there were officers whose duties did not require that they should go into action — the Chaplain, the Quartermaster, and the Surgeons. Although they had no tactical position in the line of battle, there was a loss of life among their number which entitles them to some other place in the records of the war than that of mere non-combatants. Many of them waived their exemption front danger, and gallantly volunteered for service in the field; while others — the surgeons, for instance — attended calmly <
ghth Corps was commanded by General George Crook; the First Division, comprising three brigades, was commanded by Colonel Joseph Thoburn; the Second Division, containing two brigades, was commanded by Colonel Isaac H. Duval. There were 22 regiments of infantry in the two divisions. Colonel Thoburn was killed at Cedar Creek, the last battle in which the corps participated. Colonel Duval was wounded at Opequon, whereupon Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes succeeded to the command of Duval's (2d) Divi on the 28th it was restored to General Wallace. In December, 1864, the First and Third Brigades of the First Division (Thoburn's) were transferred to the Army of the James, then near Richmond, and were designated as the Independent Division of thee Twenty-fourth Corp;s was reinforced by the First Division, Eighth Corps. This was a veteran body of troops — formerly Thoburn's Division — which had seen long and active service in West Virginia and in the Shenandoah Valley. It was transferred t
nd, being granted a furlough for thirty-five days, the regiment went to Boston. Soon after its return the army broke camp, and moved out to meet Lee in the Wilderness. At Spotsylvania the regiment encountered hard fighting, and, in the actions near that place, lost 23 killed, 101 wounded, and 5 missing; nearly one-half its effective strength. Colonel Prescott was killed in the disastrous assault on Petersburg, June 18, 1864. Thirty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. Wells's Brigade — Thoburn's Division--Eighth Corps. (1) Col. George D. Wells; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (Killed). (2) Col. William S. Lincoln; Bvt. Brig. Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 2   2 1   1 16 Company A   13 13   11 11 121   B 1 8 9   18 18 125   C   8 8   20 20 118   D 1 22 23   10 10 141   E 1 14 15   14 14 127   F   13 13   12 12 142
rover's Nineteenth 20 91 -- 111 3d Mass. Cavalry Dismounted. Grover's Nineteenth 19 87 -- 106 91st Ohio Duval's Eighth 11 95 -- 106 10th West Virginia Thoburn's Eighth 17 78 2 97 12th Maine Grover's Nineteenth 14 83 15 112 34th Massachusetts Thoburn's Eighth 6 96 -- 102 11th Vermont (H. A.) Getty's Sixth 8 85 6Thoburn's Eighth 6 96 -- 102 11th Vermont (H. A.) Getty's Sixth 8 85 6 99 37th Massachusetts Russell's Sixth 12 79 -- 91 22d Iowa Grover's Nineteenth 11 63 31 105 160th New York Detachment from 90th New York temporarily attached. Dwight's Nineteenth 15 61 1 77 131st New York Grover's Nineteenth 10 64 -- 74 1st Michigan Cavalry Merritt's Cavalry 6 33 -- 39 5th Michigan Cavalry Mer 39th Illinois Ames's Tenth 1 45 4 60 10th Connecticut Ames's Tenth 5 37 3 45 Strasburg, Va.             Oct. 13, 1864.             34th Massachusetts Thoburn's Eighth 9 48 40 97 Cedar Creek, Va.             Oct. 19, 1864.             47th Pennsylvania Dwight's Nineteenth 37 89 28 154 29th M
ug., ‘62 18th Connecticut 4 67 71 1 80 81 152 Thoburn's Eighth. Sept., ‘62 20th Connecticut 4 76rved through the war. 5 108 113 2 137 139 252 Thoburn's Eighth. Dec., ‘61 55th Pennsylvania S Served through the war.   10 10 1 62 63 73 Thoburn's Eighth. Aug., ‘61 1st Maryland, P. H. B. ‘62 10th West Virginia 2 93 95 2 144 146 241 Thoburn's Eighth. May, ‘62 11th West Virginia 4 63 67   148 148 215 Thoburn's Eighth. Aug., ‘62 12th West Virginia 3 56 59   131 131 190 Thoburn'sThoburn's Eighth. Oct., ‘62 13th West Virginia 4 57 61 1 107 108 169 Duval's Eighth. Aug., ‘62 14th We., ‘62 15th West Virginia 3 50 53 1 98 99 152 Thoburn's Eighth. Sept., ‘62 16th West Virginia   h. Oct., ‘62 123d Ohio 1 90 91 4 92 96 187 Thoburn's Eighth. Oct., ‘62 124th Ohio 7 78 85 1 1listed for one hundred days.   4 4 1 19 20 24 Thoburn's Eighth. May, ‘64 171st Ohio Enlisted d served through the war. 4 50 54 2 93 95 149 Thoburn's Eighth. July, ‘61 24th Illinois Reenl