hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
, among them Ward, one of the noble captains. Her first known ancestor, John Ward, of Gloucester, England, sometime cavalry officer in Cromwell's army, came to this country after the Restoration and settled at Newport in Rhode Island. His son Thomas married Amy Smith, a granddaughter of Roger Williams. Thomas's son Richard became Governor of Rhode Island and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He wasThomas's son Richard became Governor of Rhode Island and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was the only Colonial governor who refused to take the oath to enforce the Stamp Act. In 1775, in the Continental Congress, he was made Chairman of the Committee of the Whole, which from 1774 to 1776 sat daily, working without intermission in the cause of independence. But though one of the framers of the Declaration, he was not destined to be a signer. John Adams says of him, When he was seized with the smallpox he said that if his vote and voice were necessary to support the cause of his count
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
asy petulance of those days, more occupied with its force and polish than with its direction. To Lady Stanley's 5 o'clock tea, where I met her daughter Lady Amberley and Sir Samuel Baker, the explorer of the sources of the Nile. Dined with the Benzons, meeting Browning again. Tea with Miss Cobbe. Met the Lyells. Dined with Males family, Greek,--a most friendly occasion. Afterwards went for a short time to Mrs.--, a very wealthy Greek widow, who received us very ill. Heard there Mr. Ap Thomas, a Welsh harper who plays exceedingly well. The pleasure of hearing him scarcely compensated for Mrs.--'s want of politeness, which was probably not intentional. Saw there Sir Samuel and Lady Baker, the latter wore an amber satin tunic over a white dress, and a necklace of lion's teeth. April 5. Breakfast with Mr. Charles Dalrymple at 2 Clarges Street, where we met Mr. Grant Duff, Baron McKaye, and others. Tea at Lady Trevelyan's, where I was introduced to Dean Stanley of Westmins
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ok us to Alma-Tadema's beautiful house and garden. He met us very cordially. Mrs. Smalley came. She was Wendell Phillips's adopted daughter. I had a pleasant talk with her and with Mr. and Mrs. Hughes, whom I charged with a friendly message to Thomas himself. After this to Minister Lincoln's Fourth of July reception. Harry White, Daisy Rutherford's husband, was introduced. Elsewhere she says of this visit to Alma-Tadema:-- His charming wife, once seen, explains some of the features ofrthday. Thank God for my continued life, health, and bodily and mental powers. My prayer to Him is that, whether I am to have a year, a month, a week, or a day more, it may be for good to myself and others. Went to the Columbian Exhibition. Thomas's Orchestra playing for Mrs. Potter Palmer's reception given to the women of the Press Association. Later I went into the model kitchen where tea was served by the Cingalese. Mrs. Palmer asked me to follow her brief address with a few words. I
3, 244, 248, 252. Anderson, Isabel, II, 233. Anderson, Larz, I, 169; II, 233, 287. Andrew, John A., I, 150, 151, 186, 189, 195, 220, 231, 233, 238, 239, 246, 261, 283, 381; II, 105, 265, 323. Andrew, Mrs. J. A., I, 186, 231. Andrews, E. B., II, 187. Anniversary Week, I, 389; II, 151. Anthony, Susan, II, 344. Antioch College, I, 169. Antonayades, Mr., II, 34. Antwerp, I, 279; II, 11, 172. Antwerp Cathedral, II, 11, 172. Antwerp Musee, II, 11, 172, 173. Ap Thomas, Mr., I, 266. Apocrypha, I, 317. Appleton, Fanny, see Longfellow. Appleton, Maud, II, 58. Appleton, T. G., I, 159, 359; II, 92, 93. Argos, I, 275, 277. Argyll, Elizabeth, Duchess of, I, 267. Argyll, G. D., Campbell, Duke of, I, 267. Argyll, ninth Duke of, I, 267; II, 223. Arion Musical Society, II, 173. Aristophanes, I, 329; II, 98, 128, 130. Aristotle, I, 335; II, 7, 169, 174, 348, 372. Armenia, I, 189, 190, 209, 215. Armenia, Friends of, II, 190, 1