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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 226 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 49 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 2 0 Browse Search
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amily, to Richmond, where he has been residing ever since, and where he has been and is now engaged in the insurrection and resistance to the laws of the United States of America, now existing in said States, and in secret correspondence with the enemies of said United States residing in the city of Washington and elsewhere, transmitting to them money and other valuables, and receiving the same from them in return, which has been applied in part to aid and abet and promote the said insurrection and resistance to the laws. The great Southern Expedition sailed from Fortress Monroe, the Wabash leading, and the Cahawba bringing up the rear. The line of vessels, comprising nearly fifty, made a magnificent appearance.--N. Y. Tribune, October 31. A great Union demonstration was made by a concourse of the citizens of Baltimore, Maryland, at the Front street theatre. The principal feature of the occasion was an address by Francis Thomas, formerly governor of Maryland.--(Doc. 115.)
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
allory, Green Clay Smith, Brutus J. Clay, William H. Randall, William H. Wadsworth. Maine.--L. D. M. Sweat, Sidney Perham, James G. Blane, John H. Rice, Frederick A. Pike. Maryland.--John A. G. Cresswell, Edwin G. Webster, Henry Winter Davis, Francis Thomas, Benjamin G. Harris. Massachusetts.--Thomas D. Elliot, Oakes Ames, Alexander H. Rice, Samuel Hooper, John B. Alley, Daniel W. Gooche, George S. Boutwell, John D. Baldwin, William B. Washburn, Henry L. Dawes. Michigan.--Fernando C. Beaman, Charity. His hold on Texas is by a feeble tenure, and the confining of Taylor westward of the Atchafalaya may be of very short duration. Steele has a considerable army at Little Rock, threatening Taylor's flank, and Rosecrans, who was succeeded by Thomas in the command of the Army of the Cumberland, is at the head of the Department of the Missouri. Between the Mississippi River and the Appalachian chain of mountains little more than guerrilla operations are seen; while near the southern extremit
Vii. The Missouri struggle. Scott Clay Pinkney P. P. Barbour Webster John W. Taylor Thomas — the Compromise. when the State of Louisiana, previously known as the Territory of Orleans, was admitted into the Union, April 8, 1812.the majority in the House to secure the admission of Missouri as a Slave State. It was first proposed in the Senate by Mr. Thomas, of Illinois--a uniform opponent of Restriction on Missouri--and introduced by him February 17, 1820. in this shape:y 24 Yeas to 20 Nays — the minority embracing both advocates and opponents of Restriction. The House at first rejected Mr. Thomas's amendment by the overwhelming vote of 159 Yeas to 18 Nays. The Senate refused to recede from its amendments, and therestrict Slavery in Missouri; and that both Houses should concur in passing the bill to admit Missouri as a State, with Mr. Thomas's restriction or proviso, excluding Slavery from all Territory North and West of the new State. Fourteen members, in a
aving destroyed the armory and shops at the Ferry — the machinery having been already sent off to Richmond. The Chesapeake Canal and the several railroads in this region were thoroughly dismantled. The Potomac was crossed at Williamsport, by Gen. Thomas, on the 16th. But, for some reason, this advance was countermanded, and our troops all recrossed on the 18th--Gen. Patterson remaining at Hagerstown. The Rebels at once returned to the river, completing the work of destruction at Harper's Fes Chestnut, John L. Manning, and A. R. Chisholm. Gen. Johnston also threw himself into the thickest of the fight, seizing the colors of a Georgia regiment, and rallying them to the charge. His staff signalized themselves by their intrepidity, Col. Thomas being killed and Major Mason wounded. Your correspondent heard Gen. Johnston exclaim to Gen. Cocke, just at the critical moment, Oh, for four regiments His wish was answered; for in the distance our reinforcements appeared. The tide of bat
d been utterly disappointed and rebuffed. He closed as follows: Mr. Speaker, all the crime, all the treason of this act, rests on me, and me alone; and I am content, in the sight of high Heaven, to take it and press it to my heart. Mr. Francis Thomas, of Maryland, replied ably and thoroughly to Mr. May's assaults on the Administration and its policy of coercion; pointing to the recent vote of the People of Maryland (44,000 Union to 24,000 Peace ) as their verdict on the issues whereon tke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which prevailed by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Anthon
enough of fighting without due concentration and preparation on our side. Here he was visited, Oct. 13th, by Gen. Cameron, Secretary of War, accompanied by Adjt. Gen. Thomas and suite, who came away discouraged and dissatisfied. The heavy Autumn rains had set in some days before, and turned the rich soil of the prairies into a dnstructed to present or withhold, at his discretion. He did not present it, but brought away an unfavorable impression, which was embodied and emphasized in Adjt. Gen. Thomas's report. Those who accompanied Gens. Cameron and Thomas on this visit, and who were on terms of intimacy with them throughout, reported, on their return, tThomas on this visit, and who were on terms of intimacy with them throughout, reported, on their return, that Fremont's campaign was a failure — that he could never get his army across the Osage-certainly not to Springfield; and that southern Missouri was virtually given over to Rebel possession. These gloomy apprehensions were destined to be signally dispelled. Gen. Fremont moved southward immediately thereafter, reaching Warsaw
y L., in Dem. Convention, 315. Benton, Col. Thomas, 106; 159; speech against the Annexation treates, discovers cotton in Mexico, 58. Corwin, Thomas. of Ohio, appointed Chairman of a Select Comm., 529; at Little Bethel, 531. E. Earle, Thomas, biographer of Benj. Lundy. 115. early, Colverdy, on J. C. Calhoun, 357-8. Johnson, Rev. Thomas, settled in Kansas, 235. Johnson, Richar, his letter to Jeff. Davis, 512. Reynolds, Thomas C., is elected Lieut. Governor of Missouri, 48beaten for Governor, by Houston, 339. Rusk, Thomas J., of Texas, on Nebraska, 226. Russell, Coodora, the, conveys Mason and Slidell, 606. Thomas, Adjutant Gen., accompanies Gen. Cameron on his Western tour, 590; 615. Thomas, Col., (Rebel,) killed at Bull Run, 543. Thomas, Francis, repThomas, Francis, replies to Mr. May, 564. Thomas, Gen., crosses the Potomac, 215. Thomas, Jesse B., of 111., on Missouri, 79. Thomas, Philip Francis, appointed Secretary of the Treasury, 411; resigns, 412. Th[5 more...]
rigade of Ewell's division held the road, and was so desperately charged in front and on its right flank, that it held its ground only by the opportune arrival of Thomas's brigade of Hill's division; while the left of Jackson's division, under Taliaferro, was so assailed in flank and rear that one brigade was routed and the whole y engaged the enemy; but so severe was the fire in front and flank of Branch's brigade as to produce in it some disorder and falling back. The brigades of Gregg, Thomas, and Pender were then thrown into the fight. Soon, a portion of Ewell's division became engaged. The conflict now raged with great fury; the enemy obstinately and desperately contesting the ground until their Gens. Kearny and Stevens fell in front of Thomas's brigade; after which, they retired from the field. By the following morning, the Federal army had entirely disappeared from our view; and it soon appeared, by a report from Gen. Stuart, that it had passed Fairfax Court House and ha
Messrs. J. B. Blair and Wm. G. Brown, of Va., James S. Rollins, of Mo., and Francis Thomas, of Md., voted Nay with the Democrats and Kentuckians.] The bill, thus pass others not strictly partisans) to 31 Nays (including Crisfield, Leary, and Francis Thomas, of Md., with Crittenden, Dunlap, Harding, Wadsworth, and Wickliffe, of Ky.into power --a usurpation --destructive of the good of the country, &c., &c. Judge Thomas, of Mass., held that Congress could not warrantably pass this act without prthe Previous Question: Yeas,85 (all Republicans but Sheffield, of R. I., and Judge Thomas, of Mass.--to meet whose objections the original bill had been modified): Nader-State Unionists who voted, including Messrs. Calvert, Crisfield, Leary, Francis Thomas, and Webster, of Md., J. B. Blair, Wm. G. Brown, and Segar, of Va., Casey, ich would overthrow the one, and blot out the stars from the other. Said Judge Thomas (Conservative), of Massachusetts: That the bills before the House are in
ctively; the Center, under Maj.-Gen. Geo. II. Thomas, with its subordinate divisions led by Maj.-Ge The lesson did not require repetition. Gen. Thomas having thrown forward on our left a brigadeer McCook, numbered 15,933 ; the Center, under Thomas, 13,39; the Left, under Crittenden, 13,288; beng upon our center, where Negley's division of Thomas's corps was desperately engaged, with its ammuRebel attack had by this time fallen wholly on Thomas, commanding our center; Sheridan, entirely outey's and Rousseau's divisions. This compelled Thomas to withdraw them from the cedar woods to more lliam S. Rosecrans. Thousands had done nobly — Thomas, Sheridan, Wood, Rousseau, Palmer, Van Cleve, lowing days and nights of the fight. Under Gen. Thomas's direction. I had it intrenched by rifle-ch even Murfreesboroa could be shelled; and Gens. Thomas and Rousseau, who had for days been annoyed cavalry ordered to reconnoiter. He adds that Thomas, on Monday morning, drove the Rebel rear-guard[2 more...]
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