Your search returned 328 results in 34 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
Stony Creek station, 285. Stragglers and pillaging, 117, 331; Barlow and, 157; Warren and, 291. Stuart, James Ewell Brown, 18; death, 125. Summerhayes, John Wyer, 268. Sumner, Charles, 78. Surgeon, English fusileer, 115. Sutherland's station, 339, 341. Swede, a visiting, 41, 63; indignation of a, 262. Sykes, George, 34, 52, 53, 60, 80; visited, 8; at dinner, 72. Ta, the, 119. Thanksgiving Day, 278. Thatcher, Horace Kellogg, 171. Theatre, engineers', 311. Thomas, George Henry, 296. Thomas, Henry Goddard, 211. Thomas, Lorenzo, 290. Thompson, —, 130. Todd's Tavern, 103. Tompkins, Charles H., 112. Townsend, Charles, 22. Trobriand, Philippe Regis de, 256. Trowbridge, —, 312. Tyler, John, 159. Tyler, —, 185. Tyler house, 121. Upton, Emory, 109. Vermont captain, exploit of a, 174. Via's house, 140. Virginia, devastation, 48; houses, 301. Volunteers, 209. Votes, fraudulent, 263. Wadsworth, James Samuel, 90, 180. Wadsworth, Craig, 125. <
battle of Nashville was fought. This relieved the country in the rear of the line from menace, and one might say that the Confederacy was limited to the segment of a circle the circumference of which would pass through Richmond, Petersburg, Savannah, Atlanta, and Nashville. The policy maintained was continually to reduce the size of this circle until the Confederacy was crushed. Sherman turned north, marching through the Carolinas. Part of the troops that had fought at Nashville under Thomas were sent to Wilmington, under Schofield, after the fall of Fort Fisher. Sheridan's troopers were pressed forward up the Shenandoah Valley, to cross over to the headwaters of the James River, and down that stream to join the armies of the Potomac and of the James in front of Richmond and Petersburg. Stoneman moved from east Tennessee into the Virginias. The circle was contracted and the Confederacy was pressed on every side. This constituted the second phase of the great campaign, and th
brigadier-general, U. S. A., December 16, 1864, and after the war he was retired with the brevet of major-general. spent the winter, and where a decisive battle had been fought some months before, in the autumn of 1863. His army was composed of three parts, or, more properly, of three armies operating in concert. These were the Army of the Tennessee, led by General James B. McPherson; the Army of Ohio, under General John M. Schofield, and the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by General George H. Thomas. The last named was much larger than the other two combined. The triple army aggregated the grand total of ninety-nine thousand men, six thousand of whom were cavalrymen, while four thousand four hundred and sixty belonged to the artillery. There were two hundred and fifty-four heavy guns. Soon to be pitted against Sherman's army was that of General Joseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga.
brigadier-general, U. S. A., December 16, 1864, and after the war he was retired with the brevet of major-general. spent the winter, and where a decisive battle had been fought some months before, in the autumn of 1863. His army was composed of three parts, or, more properly, of three armies operating in concert. These were the Army of the Tennessee, led by General James B. McPherson; the Army of Ohio, under General John M. Schofield, and the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by General George H. Thomas. The last named was much larger than the other two combined. The triple army aggregated the grand total of ninety-nine thousand men, six thousand of whom were cavalrymen, while four thousand four hundred and sixty belonged to the artillery. There were two hundred and fifty-four heavy guns. Soon to be pitted against Sherman's army was that of General Joseph E. Johnston, which had spent the winter at Dalton, in the State of Georgia, some thirty miles southeast of Chattanooga.
ely in Virginia. On the 16th of December, General Thomas accomplished the defeat and utter rout of horses and supplies. Schofield's division of Thomas' army was being concentrated there for the cam a Federal battery out of Johnsonville When Thomas began to draw together his forces to meet Hoodight catch a weak spot in Thomas' forces. But Thomas had no weak spots. From the casemate, armoredes of the entire war. It has been well said of Thomas that every promotion he received was a reward ttle-line. Hood appeared before the army of Thomas, on December 2d. Preparations at once began inchments parallel to those of the Union army. Thomas was remounting his cavalry and increasing the m, giving advice and urging immediate action. Thomas stood firm. Finally an order for his removal to the right of the scene in the picture. Thomas advancing his outer line at Nashville, Decembeatching the fight to a finish between Hood and Thomas The battlefield from the military college [32 more...]
guarded. Divisions were sent to Rome and to Chattanooga. Thomas was ordered to Nashville, and Schofield to Knoxville. RecTwenty-third Corps, and Stanley, with the Fourth Corps, to Thomas at Nashville. Sherman thereupon determined to return to Atlanta, leaving General Thomas to meet Hood's appearance in Tennessee. It was about this time that Sherman fully decided s finally won to the view that if Hood moved on Tennessee, Thomas would be able to check him. He had, on the 11th of Octobernd on November 12th, after receiving a final despatch from Thomas and answering simply, Despatch received — all right, the lrmy. The Confederates thereupon turned their attention to Thomas, who was also in Tennessee, and was the barrier between Hohim immediately in Virginia. On the 16th of December, General Thomas accomplished the defeat and utter rout of Hood's army he West with over twenty-two thousand men from the army of Thomas in Tennessee. But there was little need of reenforcement.
field the task of checking the Southern army. Thomas himself sent out his couriers and drew in all ofield, the latter in command of both, back to Thomas, and this force was now at Pulaski to oppose H a Federal battery out of Johnsonville When Thomas began to draw together his forces to meet Hoodin, only to recoil, battered and bleeding. Thomas — the rock of Chickamauga who became the sledgttle-line. Hood appeared before the army of Thomas, on December 2d. Preparations at once began iNashville. It has been said that this plan of Thomas is the only one of the entire war that is now s a model in European military schools. But Thomas was not acting quickly enough to satisfy Grantm, giving advice and urging immediate action. Thomas stood firm. Finally an order for his removal ould all witness the mathematical precision of Thomas' tactics. The checking of Hood at Nashville me military college It was past noon before Thomas was ready to repeat the tactics of the precedi[24 more...]
rd's Roost. Union, Military Division of the Mississippi, commanded by Gen. W. T. Sherman: Army of the Cumberland, Maj.-Gen. Thomas; Army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gen. McPherson; Army of the Ohio, Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield, Elliott's and Stoneman's May 13-16, 1864: Resaca, Ga. Union, Fourth, Fourteenth, Twentieth, and Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, Maj.-Gen. Thomas; Fifteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gen. McPherson, and Twenty-third Corps, Army of the Ohiohope Church and Allatoona hills. Union, Fourth, Fourteenth, Twentieth, and Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, Maj.-Gen. Thomas; Twenty-third Corps, Maj.-Gen. Schofield; Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gounded, 300 captured. July 20, 1864: Peach tree Creek, Ga. Union, Fourth, Fourteenth, and Twentieth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Geo. H. Thomas; Confed., Gen. J. B. Hood's army. Losses (estimates) Union, 300 killed, 1410 wounded; Confed., 1113
en justified. The personal inspiration of the war pictures centers, naturally, in the portraits and groups. Several hundred of them are presented in the pages following. Study of them soon reveals a difference between soldier and non-combatant, as expressed in bearing and cast of countenance. It is astonishing how accurately, after examining a number of the war photographs of every description, one may distinguish in From the army to the White House: Garfield in 1863—(left to right) Thomas, Wiles, Tyler, Simmons, Drillard, Ducat, Barnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93.
—but calm and imperturbable as of old, with his crumpled army hat, plain blouse, his trousers tucked into his boot-tops, and the inevitable cigar, Ulysses S. Grant stands at a historic spot. Less than a week before, when the Union soldiers under Thomas, still smarting from their experience at Chickamauga, stood gazing at the Confederate works behind which rose the crest of Missionary Ridge, the Stars and Stripes were thrown to the breeze on the crest of Lookout Mountain. Eager hands pointed, and a great cheer went up from the Army of the Cumberland. They knew that the Union troops with Hooker had carried the day in their battle above the clouds. That was the 25th of November, 1863; and that same afternoon the soldiers of Thomas swarmed over the crest of Missionary Ridge while Grant himself looked on and wondered. When a few days later Grant visited the spot whence the flag was waved, an enterprising photographer, already on the spot, preserved the striking scene. Seated with his
1 2 3 4