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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 123 5 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
that river to Steele, who commanded in Arkansas, to hold instead of the line of the Arkansas. Orders were given accordingly, and with the expectation that the campaign would be ended in time for Banks to return A. J. Smith's command to where it belonged, The 10,000 troops under General A. J. Smith that had been thus detached belonged to the 16th and 17th corps (Sherman's army), at the time (March, 1864,) in the Mississippi Valley. Portions of these corps subsequently joined Sherman and Thomas. See also papers on the Red River Campaign, to follow.--editors. and get back to New Orleans himself in time to execute his part in the general plan. But the expedition was a failure. Banks did not get back in time to take part in the programme as laid down; nor was Smith returned until long after the movements of May, 1864, had been begun. The services of forty thousand veteran troops over and above the number required to hold all that was necessary in the Department of the Gulf were th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
d 10th Co's Ohio Sharp-shooters attached), Lieut.-Col. James N. McElroy; 50th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Edward Overton, Jr. Artillery: 7th Me., Capt. Adelbert B. Twitchell; 34th N. Y., Capt. Jacob Roemer. Fourth division, All the infantry were colored troops. Brig.-Gen. Edward Ferrero. First Brigade, Col. Joshua K. Sigfried: 27th U S., Lieut.-Col. Charles J. Wright; 30th U. S., Col. Delavan Bates; 39th U. S., Col. Ozora P. Stearns; 43d U. S., Lieut.-Col. H. Seymour Hall. Second Brigade, Col. Henry G. Thomas: 30th Conn. (detachment), Capt. Charles Robinson; 19th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Joseph Perkins; 23d U. S., Lieut.-Col. Cleveland J. Campbell. Artillery: D, Pa., Capt. George W. Durell; 3d Vt., Capt. Romeo H. Start. Cavalry: 3d N. J., Col. Andrew J. Morrison; 22d N. Y., Col. Samuel J. Crooks; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 13th Pa., Maj. Michael Kerwin. Reserve artillery, Capt. John Edwards, Jr.: 27th N. Y., Capt. John B. Eaton; D, 1st R. I., Capt. William W. Buckley; H, 1st R
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
ers attached), Lieut.-Col. James N. McElroy; 50th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Edward Overton, Jr. Acting Engineers. 17th Mich., Col. Constant Luce. Artillery: 7th Me., Capt. Adelbert B. Twitchell; 34th N. Y., Capt. Jacob Roemer. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. Edward Ferrero. First Brigade, Col. Joshua K. Sigfried: 27th U. S. C. T., Col. Charles J. Wright; 30th U. S. C. T., Col. Delavan Bates; 39th U. S. C. T., Col. Ozora P. Stearns; 43d U. S. C. T., Lieut.-Col. H. Seymour Hall. Second Brigade, Col. Henry G. Thomas: 19th U. S. C. T., Lieut.-Col. Joseph G. Perkins; 23d U. S. C. T., Lieut.-Col. Cleaveland J. Campbell; 31st U. S. C. T., Maj. Theo. H. Rockwood. Artillery. D, Pa., Capt. George W. Durell; 3d Vt., Capt. Romeo H. Start. Reserve artillery, Capt. John Edwards, Jr.: 27th N. Y., Capt. John B. Eaton; D, 1st R. I., Capt. William W. Buckley; H, 1st R. I., Capt. Crawford Allen, Jr.; E, 2d U. S., Lieut. Samuel B. McIntire. cavalry Corps, Maj.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan. Escort: 6th U. S., Ca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
the full cooperation of my great lieutenants, Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, as good and true mee was in progress, Schofield at the center and Thomas on the right made efforts to break through thereenforced and warned of the coming blow. General Thomas was sent back to the headquarters of his dorps to Nashville, all the reenforcements that Thomas deemed necessary to enable him to defend Tenneed it as now my eulogists do, but coupled with Thomas's acts about Nashville, and those about Richmo than to acquiesce; and taking the work of General Thomas into account, as it should be taken, it isand I confess that I felt more anxious for General Thomas's success than my own, because had I left t my division of force was liberal, leaving to Thomas enough to vanquish the old opposing force of tized and resupplied his army, advanced against Thomas at Nashville, who had also made every preparatm of the war. Hood's losses were 15,000 men to Thomas's 3057. Therefore at the end of the year 18[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
the attempt was abandoned, either by the general's orders or by the discretion of the troops. General Sherman and General Thomas during the assault at Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864. from a sketch made at the time. General Sherman is the slenderer figure, on the right. He and General Thomas were standing by the signal tree from which ran telegraphic wires to the front, by means of which reports were received and orders transmitted during the battle. On the 24th Hardee's skirmisherbel trenches and there covered them-selves with parapet. McPherson lost about 500 men and several valuable officers, and Thomas lost nearly 2000 men. In his Memoirs Sherman says, in continuation of the quotation made by Johnston: This was the two hours and a half was at very short range. It is not to be believed that Southern veterans struck but 3 per cent. of Thomas's troops in mass at short range, or 1 2/3 per cent. of McPherson's — and, if possible, still less so that Northern soldie
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opening of the Atlanta campaign. (search)
e operations known as the Dalton-Atlanta campaign opened on May 5th, 1864, by the advance of General Thomas on Tunnel Hill, and on May 7th the withdrawal of our forces within Mill Creek Gap marked thed been seized by an Indiana regiment and held until Cleburne retook it. As early as February General Thomas, knowing that at that time Snake Creek Gap was unguarded, proposed a campaign, the plan bein0,000 men and 254 guns, divided into three armies — the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by General Thomas, numbering 60,773; the Army of the Tennessee, General McPherson, 24,465; the Army of the Ohi. His march was concealed by Hooker's corps of the Army of the Cumberland, which corps, forming Thomas's right, marching from Ringgold via Nickajack Gap and Trickum, hid the flank movement of McPhersk . With Hooker descending from Rocky-face on our left flank and rear, McPherson holding Resaca, Thomas, with the corps of Howard and Palmer, pushing to D)alton, and Schofield to his left, our army wo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
ral Hood gave orders for two corps to take position ready to attack Thomas's army on Peach Tree Creek, whilst one corps watched and guarded aghe two corps then in the neighborhood of Peach Tree Creek to attack Thomas's army in that position at 1 P. M. on the 20th. At the time named Thomas's army was engaged in crossing the creek. The armies of Schofield and McPherson were not within good supporting distance, and it is safor the attack at 1 P. M. had been promptly obeyed by the two corps Thomas would have met with serious disaster before the forces of SchofieldThat division was sent off before it had been put in action against Thomas. The Confederate attack on the latter was repulsed. If Hood's o would probably have resulted in a staggering blow to Sherman. But Thomas had safely crossed Peach Tree Creek, and was strongly established on its south side. Schofield was again in fair communication with Thomas, and McPherson was extending his fortifications south of the railroad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
ered Atlanta. I was informed on the 19th that Thomas was building bridges across Peach Tree Creek; ve closely and report promptly the progress of Thomas in the construction of bridges across Peach TrPherson's and Schofield's forces from those of Thomas; and, finally, to intrench his line thoroughly. This object accomplished, and Thomas having partially crossed the creek and made a lodgment on thmpossible for Schofield or McPherson to assist Thomas without recrossing Peach Tree Creek in the vicde fire of batteries placed in position by General Thomas. Unfortunately, the corps on Stewart's n a measure, his strange blunder in separating Thomas so far from Schofield and McPherson. I wellanta campaign. The rap of warning received by Thomas, on Peach Tree Creek, must have induced the Feofield and McPherson were still separated from Thomas, and at such distance as to compel them to makot only to occupy and keep a strict watch upon Thomas, in order to prevent him from giving aid to Sc[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
him. Banks evacuated Alexandria on the 12th and 13th of May, the fleet quitted the Red River, and the campaign ended with the occupation of all the country we had held at its beginning, as well as of the lower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith from obeying Sherman's order to return to Vicksburg in time for the Atlanta campaign. A. J. Smith did not rejoin Sherman, but, after Sherman had set out for Savannah, he joined Thomas in time to take part in the battle of Nashville.--editors. Through the courtesy of the editors of this work, I have carefully read a statement in which are grouped in detail the covert insinuations, the gossip of camps and capitals, and the misstatements of well-known facts that go to make up the old story of many versions of an arrangement at Washington whereby Kirby Smith's army was to recede before the army of General Banks, falling back through the State of Texas, and finally to disb
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Land operations against Mobile. (search)
ndered at 2:30 P. M. About five hundred prisoners were taken and about fifty guns. General Grant, in his official report, says: The total captures [at the three forts] amounted to 1464 prisoners and 104 pieces of artillery.--editors. After Thomas had overthrown Hood at Nashville (December 16th, 1864), Grant ordered him to follow Hood south, but when in January the badness of the roads stopped the movement at Eastport, Grant detached A. J. Smith with the reorganized Sixteenth Corps The seventy-five wagons. The siege of Blakely began on the 2d of April. From left to right the lines of attack were held by Garrard's division of the Sixteenth Corps, Veatch's and Andrews's of the Thirteenth Corps, and Hawkins's colored division. Thomas's brigade of boy reserves had the right, and Cockrell's division the left, of the defenses. On the afternoon of the 9th, twenty-eight guns being in position, and Spanish Fort having fallen, the Confederate works were captured by a general assaul
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