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Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 213 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 48 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 0 Browse Search
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Bible. The first Bible printed in America was Eliot's Indian translation, issued at Cambridge. Mass, in 1663. A German edition of the Bible, in quarto, was printed at Germantown, near Philadelphia, in 1743, by Christopher Saner. In 1782 Robert Aitkin, printer and bookseller in Philadelphia, published the first American edition of the Bible in English, also in quarto form; and in 1791 Isaiah Thomas printed the Bible in English, in folio form, at Woreester. Mass. This was the first in that form issued from the press in the United States. The same year Isaac Collins printed the English version, in quarto form, at Trenton, N. J.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Braddock, Edward, 1695- (search)
ompetent testimony seems to prove that he was slot by Thomas Faucett, one of the provincial soldiers. His plea in extenuation of the crime was self-preservation. Braddock who had spurned the advice of Washington about the method of fighting Indians, had issued a positive order that none of the English should protect themselves behind trees, as the French and Indians did. Faucett's brother had taken such a position, and when Braddock perceived it, he struck him to the earth with his sword. Thomas, on seeing his brother fall, shot Braddock in the back. The provincials fought bravely, and early all were killed. The remnant of the regulars broke and fled when Braddock fell. Washington, who was left in chief command, perceiving the day was lost, rallied the few provincial troops, and carrying with him his dying general, gallantly covered the retreat. The enemy did not pursue. The British left their cannon General Edward Braddock. and their dead on the battle-field. Three days aft
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bragg, Braxton, -1876 (search)
oughly handled that they fled in haste towards eastern Tennessee, followed by their marauding bands, who had plundered the inhabitants in every direction. Bragg soon afterwards abandoned Kentucky. The armies of Rosecrans and Bragg confronted each other for several months in Tennessee after the battle of Stone River (q. v.). Rosecrans remained on the scene of the battle; Bragg was below the Duck River. Finally the Army of the Cumberland, in three divisions, commanded respectively by Generals Thomas, McCook, and Crittenden, began its march (June 23, 1863) from Murfreesboro to Chattanooga. General Burnside, in Kentucky, was ordered to move through the mountains into eastern Tennessee to co-operate with Rosecrans. At that time Bragg's left wing, under General (Bishop) Polk, lay at Shelbyville, behind formidable intrenchments about 5 miles in length, cast up by legally emancipated slaves drawn from northern Georgia and Alabama. General Hardee, with 12,000 men, was at War Trace, on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Russell, Benjamin 1761-1845 (search)
Russell, Benjamin 1761-1845 Journalist; born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 13, 1761; learned the printer's art of Isaiah Thomas; served in the army of the Revolution; and was the army correspondent of Thomas's newspaper, the Massachusetts spy, published at Worcester, Mass. In 1784 he began the publication, in Boston, of the Columbian Centinel, a semi-weekly, which soon became the leading newspaper in the country, containing contributions from men like Ames, Pickering, and other able men of the FThomas's newspaper, the Massachusetts spy, published at Worcester, Mass. In 1784 he began the publication, in Boston, of the Columbian Centinel, a semi-weekly, which soon became the leading newspaper in the country, containing contributions from men like Ames, Pickering, and other able men of the Federal school in politics. Mr. Russell was twenty-four years a representative of Boston in the Massachusetts Assembly, and was for several years in the State Senate and the executive council. He was the originator of the word Gerrymandering (q. v.). He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 4, 1845.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thomas, Isaiah 1749-1831 (search)
Thomas, Isaiah 1749-1831 Printer; born in Boston, Mass., Jan. 19, 1749; was apprenticed to a printer seven years, and started business for himself in Newburyport, Mass., when he was eighteen yeares and school books used in the English colonies, and in the States afterwards, were issued from Thomas's press at Worcester. He printed several editions of the Bible. In 1791 he issued a folio edit in quarto, with a concordance; in 1793 an edition in octavo; and in 1797 another in duodecimo. Thomas says Isaac Collins printed, at Trenton, N. J. (where he was State printer), a handsome and very correct octavo edition of the Bible. Collins also printed a quarto edition. In 1812 Mr. Thomas founded the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester; provided a building for its use on his grounds; He also made a provision for the maintenance of the library and museum equal to about $24,000. Mr. Thomas wrote and published (1810) a valuable History of printing. He died in Worcester, Mass., April
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Worcester, (search)
he Blackstone River; 44 miles west of Boston. It is noted for the variety and extent of its manufactures, especially of wire, envelopes, looms, boots and shoes, and machinery for cotton and woollen mills. The city, which contains a large number of villages, was settled in 1674 under the name of the Quinsigamond Plantations. The first settlement was soon broken up by hostile Indians; as was also the second one, in 1684. A permanent one was made in 1713; the town was incorporated June 14, 1722; and a city charter was granted Feb. 29, 1848. The first church was organized in 1719. Between 1790 and 1800 Isaiah Thomas, who had moved there from Boston, carried on the most extensive publishing business in the country. The Declaration of Independence was first publicly read in Massachusetts from the steps of the Old South Church there. The development of Worcester's manufacturing interests has been rapid since 1828, when the Blackstone Canal was opened. Population in 1900, 118,421.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
n published, . . . began the publication, at his own risk, of a third newspaper, entitled The New England Courant. Isaiah Thomas, History of printing in America. In Transactions and collections of the American antiquarian Society, vol. v, p. 11as, Brutus, and many more argued hotly and often powerfully the whole question of allegiance, on abstract grounds. Isaiah Thomas's Massachusetts spy shows the course of this long battle. Constantly on the verge of being suppressed, from its estannsylvania magazine and The Royal American magazine, were edited respectively by the two firebrands, Thomas Paine and Isaiah Thomas. Paine's magazine did not lack pungent wit of one kind or another, although for the more strictly literary sections both he and Isaiah Thomas drew freely on conventional English sources which, in theory, they should have rejected. Thomas's Royal American magazine is enlivened by the famous Paul Revere engravings and is otherwise interesting, particularly for its
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
iew, the, 206 British spy in Boston, the, 237 n. Broker of Bogota, 222,224 Brook Farm, 339-340, 345 Brooke, Henry, 165 Brother Jonathan, 309 Brothers, Thomas, 207 Brougham, John, 232 Brown, Charles Brockden, 287-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. B98 Prelude, the, 197, 213 Prescott, 277, 309 Price, Richard, 91, 97, 102, 147 Priestley, 91, 97, 99, 102 Prime, Dr., Benjamin Young, 168 Prince, Rev. Thomas, 20, 27-28, 113 Prince of Parthia, the, 216, 217, 225, 232 Prince Society, 28 Principles (Bishop Berkeley), 58 Prior, 112, 116, 175, 176, 177, 178sa Contarini, 224 Terrible Tractoration, 174 Thacher, Oxenbridge, 127, 128, 131 Thackeray, 279 Thanatopsis, 163, 212, 262, 262 n., 263, 265, 267 Thomas, Isaiah, 112 n., 120, 123 Thompson, Benjamin, 152, 158 Thompson, D. P., 307, 308, 310 Thomson, Charles, 98 Thomson, James, 161, 162, 163, 181, 215, 262 n.,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
37, 338, 344, 402 Taylor, John, 84-85 Temperance, 45 Tennent, Gilbert, 198 Tennessee's partner, 380, 385 Tennyson, 3, 5, 39, 52, 224, 248, 254, 271 Tenting on the old camp ground, 285 Tent on the Beach, the, 46, 49 Ten years on a Georgia plantation, 3, 4 Term of service ended, 286 Terrell, Uncle, George, 354 Thackeray, 153, 172, 232, 371, 384, 391 Thayer and Eldridge, 268 Theology explained and defended, 200 Thierry, 128 Thirty years view, 90 Thomas, Isaiah, 180 Thomas, Theodore, 335 Thompson, J. R., 169, 290, 298, 301, 305, 306, 308, 311 Thompson, Maurice, 303 Thompson, Mortimer, 156 Thompson, W. H., 284 Thompson, William Tappan, 153, 347-348 Thoreau, Helen, 2 Thoreau, Henry David, 1-15, 20, 165, 245, 267 Thoreau, John, 9 Thorpe, Thomas Bangs, 154 Thousand and one nights, the, 367 Three books of song, 39 Three hundred thousand more, 281, 285 Three tales, 388 Through Baltimore, 280 Ticknor, Dr. Franci
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
tionary of the English language, the, 480 These many years, 273 Thier Numer, 1, 606 Thierry, Augustin, 456 Thierry, Camille, 596 Thilly, 261 n. Third degree, the, 287 13th Chair, The, 293 Thirty-one years on the Plains and Mountains, 153 $30,000 Bequest, The, 14 Thirty years of labour, 358 Thirty years view . . . 1820 to 1850, 139 Thoburn, J. M., 212 Thomas, Augustus, 278, 279, 280, 282– 83, 284, 285, 287 Thomas, A. E., 294 Thomas, Edith, 312 Thomas, Isaiah, 537 n. Thompson, D. P., 416 Thompson, Denman, 285 Thompson, Maurice, 91 Thompson, R. E., 436 Thompson, S., 28 n., 29 n. Thompson, Waddy, 132, 133 Thomson, James, 539, 452 Thoreau, 112, 115, 116, 162, 313, 415 Thorndike, E. L., 422 Thorpe, 479 Those extraordinary Twins, 18 Thoughts and things, 257 Thoughts suggested by Mr. Froude's progress, 124 Thoughts on the present collegiate system of the United States, 413 Thoughts on the study of political econ
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