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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
blown up and had one man badly burned. After the return of this section to the line (for we had thrown up here a temporary line of breastworks) we remained in full view of the enemy until the quietness was suddenly broken by the wounding of William Ellis Jones by a sharpshooter, when again we commenced the same old unfortunate artillery duelling, in which we again were to suffer a percussion shell of the enemy, striking the front of one of our pieces, bursting and wounding three men—Sergeant Jeff. Thomas, who was shot in the face and painfully wounded; Alonzo Phillips, also shot in the face and dangerously wounded, and Richard Seeley, whose face was so badly cut that he never returned to the battery. It now became apparent to General Grant, who had been butting up against our earthworks, that his famous declaration of fighting it out on that line if it took all the summer, was not to be fulfilled. After several brilliant charges on the part of both armies, notably the one of the Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
ons blown up and had one man badly burned. After the return of this section to the line (for we had thrown up here a temporary line of breastworks) we remained in full view of the enemy until the quietness was suddenly broken by the wounding of William Ellis Jones by a sharpshooter, when again we commenced the same old unfortunate artillery duelling, in which we again were to suffer by the shells of the enemy, striking the front of one of our pieces, bursting and wounding three men-Sergeant Jeff. Thomas, who was shot in the face and painfully wounded; Alonzo Phillips, also shot in the face and dangerously wounded, and Richard Seeley, whose face was so badly cut that he never returned to the battery. It now became apparent to General Grant, who had been butting up against our earthworks, that his famous declaration of fighting it out on that line if it took all the summer, was not to be fulfilled. After several brilliant charges on the part of both armies, notably the one of the Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.69 (search)
unded at Gettysburg and died since. William Stuart, captured at Williamsburg and never returned. George W. Toney, captured at Williamsburg and never returned; living. James M. Thompson, died in 1861. H. C. Thompson, living. John Pres. Thomas, killed at Gettysburg. Jeff. Thomas, living, but lost a leg. James Thomas, died in 1862. William H. Turner, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at BoonsborougJeff. Thomas, living, but lost a leg. James Thomas, died in 1862. William H. Turner, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at Boonsborough, Md., 1863. John Wright, died in 1861. H. G. White, wounded at Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864; living. H. M. White, living. A. J. Whittaker, wounded at Williamsburg and died since the war. William M. Whittaker, living. This company was made up in Mercer County, Va. (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the 24th Virginia Regiment throughout the war, and belonged to the First Brigade of the First Division, commanded by Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company G, Twenty-Fourth Virginia Infantry. From the Richmond Dispatch, June 17, 1901. (search)
unded at Gettysburg and died since. William Stuart, captured at Williamsburg and never returned. George W. Toney, captured at Williamsburg and never returned; living. James M. Thompson, died in 1861. H. C. Thompson, living. John Pres. Thomas; killed at Gettysburg. Jeff. Thomas, living, but lost a leg. James Thomas, died in 1862. William H. Turner, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at BoonsborougJeff. Thomas, living, but lost a leg. James Thomas, died in 1862. William H. Turner, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at Boonsborough, Md., 1863. John Wright, died in 1861. H. G. White, wounded at Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864; living. H. M. White, living. A. J. Whitteker, wounded at Williamsburg and died since the war. William M. Whitaker, living. This company was made up in Mercer county, Va., (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiment throughout the war, and belonged to the First Brigade of the First Division, commande